EVE Online Suicide Taunter Goes Well Beyond Apologising

The Mittani, a senior player in the EVE Online community and the man at the centre of yesterday's story about suicide taunts at a game convention, has gone well beyond apologising for his actions.

Saying that "actions > words" and that he hates it "when people use alcohol as an excuse" for their behaviour (The Mittani had clearly had a few during the panel), he has posted on Twitter that not only will he be resigning from his senior position within the game's community, but that he'll also be sending all of his remaining in-game currency to the "victim".

Some will say that, given the possibility the "victim" wasn't even being truthful in their actions, that's crazy. Even those aware that the real issue was simply attacking the player in the first place (as they couldn't have known whether it was genuine or not) might say it's a bit much, especially since his main apology was so sincere.

But hey, this is what it looks like when somebody takes actual responsibility for their mistakes,

The Mittani [Twitter]


Comments

    Good on him. The "power" went to his head.

      Power is usually given to people who will abuse it, seriously, look at every aspect of OUR ENTIRE FUCKING GOVERNMENT.

        How's that tin hat feel?

          Inadequet, lately. Sadly, reality passed conspiracy a few years back. :(

    Would have been better if he sold everything and gave all the profits to a suicide prevention charity

      he has taken responsibility. give the dude a break

    Everyone makes mistakes. He's genuinely sorry instead of being am ass about it so fair enough.

    Considering the reaction comments I was seeing, this was probably an appropriate response.

    Hmm, arse resolved with class, certainly makes for a nice change, good on him for not digging his heels in & becoming even worse.

    Appreciate he's taken responsibility. But part of taking responsibility is taking on the chin everything that comes his way. Yes, we should be the mature ones and demonstrate understanding of his youth, his lack of insight, his drunkenness, the peer pressure, etc etc etc. But you know what? He picked on someone, and he did it in a mean and vicious way in order to get laughs from people who didn't see any harm in picking on someone. If we think it's ok to forgive him so easily, then we should consider ourselves even more easily forgiven for rightly pointing out just what a (bleeping bleep) he is.

      So your philosophy is that no matter how hard someone works to try and prove they are truly sorry for a momentary lapse in judgement, we should continue to condemn them for what they did? I'm sure it's ok because you have never made any kind of mistake ever and tried to fix it up afterwards.

        Not exactly. My philosophy is that people should own up and accept what they did was wrong, and suffer the consequences of their actions nobly, and accept that what they get for their idiocy is what they deserve. I've made plenty of mistakes and have been sorry, but have never asked for forgiveness, only asked that the other person realise that i'm sorry. If what I did was so wrong that I should be condemned *forever*, then who am I to refute this? It's not exactly in the spirit of apologising if i'm negotiating terms.

        This person did some stupid things. They apologised. No one is under any obligation to forgive him - if anything, forgiving someone prematurely could mean they don't learn any lasting lesson.

          Did he offend you personally? You really don't get much of a say in actually forgiving him if he didn't actually do something wrong against you. This is mostly between him and the guy who was bullied, so if the guy forgives him, what will you say then? Anyway, he took the first step towards apologising, a little less persecution and a little more forgiveness and this world could be a slightly nicer place.

            That's true, and a fair point. I don't really think any of us have a say in whether he should be forgiven or not. The main difference is that he did it in a public forum, on a matter close to a lot of people's hearts. As a result, he's now getting the sort of scrutiny his actions will inevitably warrant and (I would argue) deserve. As I said, I appreciate he apologised, but I don't think it's up to others to say 'Oh, he apologised, get off his back' or words to that effect, because it's not really their call either. He did what he did, he apologised, but he still has to sleep in the bed that he made.

    Apparently he was drunk and it wasn't premeditated. Where did the slide come from then? It obviously took preparation. I've got no sympathy for pricks like this. If he got to his current age without realising that this was arsehole behaviour, then just imagine all of the other helples sods that he's stepped on throughout his life.

    A bit of fear will do him good.

      The slide did not reveal the name of the player and it didn't egg on other players to harass him. There was a remark from an audience member after the presentation regarding that particular player, and The Mittani named him at that point. There doesn't appear to be any evidence that he planned to reveal the victim's name beforehand. Alcohol is a judgment inhibitor and he did something really terrible. It happens. It's definitely not an excuse, but there it is.

    No, I hate Luke's? Is it a public holiday or something?

    wait
    im still unclear
    did someone actually die here or was it an in game character?

    So you think there was nothing wrong with showing that slide? Was there some noble reason for showing it? Aside from taking the piss out of that poor fella? Get real! I'm not arguing legalities here. I'm saying that identity-or-not, this idiot had plans to big-note himself by belittling his victim well before the show started. There was plenty of arseholiness on display and revealing the guy's identity (spare of the moment or not) was only part of it.

      :CCP: ok'd the slides before they went to air, then hung mittens out to dry.

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