They Said Alan Wake Couldn't Be Modded; Hello Kitty Says They Were Wrong

When it released for PC in February 2012, Alan Wake came with no mod tools. Developer Remedy Entertainment said tools wouldn't be released because of their complexity, and their dependence on third-party tools which would presumably require permissions or licenses.

That hasn't stopped Alan Wake's community from hurling itself at the task, which, to change textures, requires unpacking and repacking a 2.9 gigabyte file, using a community-released tool. Against these odds, modder Xymbiot3 has defiantly released this, which gives Alan's flashlight ... a Hello Kitty pattern. And Alan a Mike Tyson face tattoo. Problem is, because it all has to be repacked into a 3GB file, it's impractical to distribute. But here, at least, you can say that you have seen Alan Wake running around like Ed Helms in The Hangover II.

Alan Wake Flashlight Mod Images [Remedy Games Community, h/t Matt.]


Comments

    when will devs and publishers learn, you can not tell the PC community that your game can not be modded because the community will take you to task just out of spite! Battlefield 1942 never had any offical tools but that didnt stop any one from modding it and neither did quake or unreal ( it wasnt until halfway through UT99 that the UDK was released)

      Nothing the devs have said is wrong: creating modding tools for general use *does* require licensing and require extra QC to ensure the modding tools they develop don't fuck up the main game files and don't crash and shit in and of itself.

      The standards of some random person creating tools of their own volition don't need to be as high, which is why the community end up creating tools themselves.

        tell that to DICE who when they released the "offical" tools were in fact the ones made by the community.

      It's an interesting predicament - while the 'no mods possible ' line almost always tends to be wrong, it's more just a case of the devs wanting to save cash and time and support - covering their asses. And while I object to it on the basis that it is incorrect, it seems like the best way to spur people into making mods for your game, sort of out of spite.

      when will devs and publishers learn, you can not tell the PC community that your game can not be modded

      It was said that no mod tools would be released for the game by Remedy. It's not like they went around thumbing their nose and saying "ha ha, no one will ever be able to mod this."

    Correct me if i'm wrong but isn't the Hello Kitty light an homage to one of the first Doom3 mod's?

      Not sure about that... But I do remember my friends and I modding the Doom3 alpha to have goatse as the flashlight

      BoingBoing to the rescue... http://boingboing.net/2004/08/09/hello-kitty-flashlig.html

    Someone will probably build a repack tool. So they can release the mods as minimal file size and then the user runs the repack too to install the mod.

      I was thinking the exact same thing.

      As soon as the first mod appears, all immediate problems with its release will be identified and a launcher of some kind will be built to enable/disable the mods. In this case, pack files appropriately.

      Dating back to Dark Forces 2, every game I've investigated the mod community of has eventually had a launcher for these kinds of purposes.

      I wish more games would support modding and release mod tools off the bat. User generated content almost always keeps a game alive longer than it otherwise would have. And modders are just more creative/free to express creativity better than developers.

    Should be able to do a simple binary diff patch for the file (IPS etc)...

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