Realism's Place In The Legend Of Zelda

Edge magazine has an interview with Legend of Zelda series director Eiji Aonuma in their 211th issue feature, Links To The Past. His feelings on Twilight Princess? Regret.

In a snippet of of the interview reprinted on Edge Online, Aonuma says that the realistic look and feel of Twilight Princess presented challenges for the designers to incorporate ideas that fit with the "sheer grand scale" of the game. "I am afraid that definitely no, we were not able to do all the things that perhaps with hindsight we had the capabilities to do. With that as the starting point, we are now developing the Wii version of Legend Of Zelda."

Aonuma goes on to say:

"In the case of Spirit Tracks it was relatively easier, because regardless of the actual proportions between the player character and the other objects, we can simply concentrate upon the many game ideas we want to realise. But in the case of trying to depict a relatively photorealistic three-dimensional world, we have to be very careful to adapt the ideas so that they seem to perfectly fit with that world. I must admit that's actually one of my very greatest regrets as regards the Twilight Princess."

Sounds like a pretty good interview. I look forward to seeing the whole thing in print when Edge 211 hits the shelves.

Aonuma's Regrets For Twilight Princess [Edge Online]


Comments

    Hmm. I don't know what to think of this.

    On one hand I think that games nowadays should be a lot more colourful, like Mario Galaxy or Wind Waker.

    But on the other hand, Twilight Princess's graphical style was realistic, yet I loved it, as it perfectly suited the storyline and mood of the game and would love to see more of it.

    Maybe there should be two types of Zelda games. TP styled realistic games with dark stories, and WW styled cartoony games with light, fun, traditional stories.

    Well, i doubt more realistic Zelda games will be made. They seem to be favouring the focus on gameplay they get when they don't have to focus on realistic graphics which in my opinion is great. also i think i remember something about nintendo saying they will still be focusing on more stylised (cartoony) games instead of realistic ones.

    I dont like the cartoony style. I like the more realistic style of Twilight Princess.

    I'm sad and disheartened to say I really didn't enjoy Twilight princess at all (personally I found it to be nowhere near as enchanting and fun to play as the morbidly unappreciated wind waker) and I bought a wii just to play it.

    The world itself felt so empty and uninspired, riding across the plain with nothing of interest to really see or do and I guess I just got so tired of the same Ideas being recycled over and over again. Everything fell short of its potential wonderment from over used and uninspired key items to uninteresting generic characters and finally, the premise of saving Hyrule for the umpteenth time with some questionable wii-mote controls. It was the first time since literally being a child and basking in the awe and greatness of a distant and fabled hero that I felt the Zelda formula begin to crack and crumble.

    This title was literally a turning point in my gaming life because it kind of crushed the fanboy that had been living in me for all these years. I finally realized Nintendo can actually do wrong and how stale and predicable something I loved as a kid had become... and I finally had the balls to admit it to myself.

    It wasn’t clear to me back then but It’s clear to me now that anyone that makes up their mind (be it good or bad) before playing a game, even from an old friend like Nintendo is well... a fool.

      'Reply to MikeZdoesit'

      Couldn't agree with you more mate. I have nothing but negative memories of Twilight Princess. It was so unbelievably stale. I didn't hate it, but the series' magic was sadly missing. It just seemed like the characters were all asleep or only half completed. The world was immense but there was nothing of interest in it. The wolf was an average and unnecessary addition, although it was at least an attempt at something new. The game was easier than OoT and MM too, I think. There was never a moment where you wondered what to do next. You just rode through an empty wilderness for a while, waggled the remote at orcs of all things, rode through empty wilderness, dived off a cliff, rode through wilderness, walked through empty frozen house, wilderness... etc. They tried hard in the wrong areas with this one. I'd be happier with more simplistic looking games, if it meant the magic of OoT and MM would return. Here's a question though, why can't they do both. I mean, TP was pretty good looking, but not unbelievably good, even for a gamecube game. Don't Nintendo have the best in the business working for them in both the programming and design areas?

      I started playing Spirit Tracks last night and after an hour or so, still feel as though this is more of the same... just with a train and not a horse or boat. IMAGINE if Nintendo changed up the formula completely, in terms of story if nothing else. I'm sick of starting Zelda games by visiting Zelda in the castle, only for some evil (aka the same one each time) to come in and ruin the day, then follows is 20 odd hours of piecing together ancient artifacts or magical stones to open doors to ancient areas that house the same old master sword again and again and again. Will simply adding motion plus controls to the sword be enough of a change to this new wii zelda? Is the series too precious to really up and change in drastic ways?

      At the moment, it does leave a slightly stale taste in the mouth.

    Where's my Ocarina or Majora style? I love the lighthearted feel of the DS games, and I might like the dark feel of Twilight Princess if I liked the gameplay (too much waggling + what was with the wolf?), but I want a true Zelda game a la the 64 ones. Dark, but with lighthearted feeling to it. Innovations that still kept Link and Epona together. Side quests that actually felt like the main storyline.

    I just feel that Zelda games have really descended since the glory of Majora's Mask, a game which still holds up today. Seriously, plug in your 64 or download it on the Wii - it is still riveting.

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