The Most Important Changes Of The Last Decade In Gaming Are...?

Hmm. Mass-market penetration? Cultural acceptance? Ubiquitous online connectivity? Subscription-based pricing models? Mobile gaming? The Sega Dreamcast?

IGN AU polled some of the brightest minds in game development around the world on the topic of the last ten years of gaming. They asked: What have been the most important changes in videogames, videogame technology and in the wider videogame industry, over the last ten years?

The consensus was the wider cultural acceptance of video games as a mainstream form of entertainment.

Forza developer Dan Greenawalt said, "As the videogames industry continues to grow and attract new audiences, interactive entertainment has become deeply engrained into modern life as an expression of how we spend our free time."

Bayonetta developer Hideki Kamiya agreed, "Gaming has come to be broadly considered as one of many entertainments, not a subculture in a closed world. It is an interesting evolution that some consoles are now accepted by families."

Others, such as Krome's Steve Stamatiadis, Gearbox's Randy Pitchford and Rocksteady's Paul Denning argued the case for the way the internet has changed the way we play and interact with games.

"Today, we can play with anyone, anywhere in the world via the internet," Pitchford told IGN. "This connectivity allows for other opportunities to develop via specific social networks and digital distribution tools thus in turn creating a more direct relationship between the players and the game makers."

Check out the full Q&A where the same devs also reveal their favourite gaming systems, favourite games and biggest flops of the decade.

And then come back here and tell us what you think was the most significant change in the games industry over the last decade?

The Last Decade in Gaming: A Developer Roundtable [IGN AU]


Comments

    The internet. It distributes, it advertises. It provides accessibility and serves as a platform itself. It slices, it dices...

    ..sorry. Sure, the internet is not "the last decade" new, and games were into the internet before most other things, so more the "evolution of the internet" as a socially accepted and widely used tool.

    So guess I agree with cultural acceptance. Mobile gaming was trendy before, pricing models were trendy before and the Dreamcast was simply a valuble lesson for us all.

    Graphics would also be an enormous inclusion in my mind. Though I still can enjoy games with 16 colours, there is something magical about not being able to count the pixels on your screen.

      Yeah the online stuff bought me back to consoles. I really missed the old "tv game" but enjoyed online play on the PC. Now I pretty much have both.

      "Graphics would also be an enormous inclusion in my mind. Though I still can enjoy games with 16 colours, there is something magical about not being able to count the pixels on your screen."

      That attitude is why starting up a new games company now is basically suicide and the depth of most games produced can be measured in microns.

      Now, games on consoles like the DS on the other hand... Beautiful!

    I think there is still some road to travel with getting mass acceptance of gaming as a regular activity alongside going to the movies or playing sport.

    This is especially true when discussing gaming as an activity for adults. All we need to do is look at how quickly games like MW2, GTA or even Mass Effect and the Fox news debacle a few years ago to see that media and non-gamers can really get the wrong idea about gaming as a passtime. It isn't something that only teenagers do, those original teenagers have now grown up. I know because I'm one of them. I think this is still probably the biggest challenge we face here in Australia in the coming years especially.

    The Dreamcast! The Dreamcast! Hell yeah! lol

    I particularly love the fact that the same people (looking at you, Dad) who for 10 years threatened to throw out 'that effing game' (its a console, into which you can put many such 'effing games', Dad), and complain that games are destroying social skills and sporting prowess, now find it perfectly acceptable to spend hours a week socialising by playing sports games on something called a Wii. Never mind the fact that I cannot get to Darksiders on the Ps3 atm since my gf has since starting off, in the last 3 weeks come to be playing MW2 than I do!

    “Today, we can play with anyone, anywhere in the world via the internet,”

    Dunno where he was, but I was doing this almost 15 years ago with Quakeworld.

    Also, I really hate it when people emphasize that you can play with 'anyone in the world' when the reality is that you want to play with people in your region to reduce lag.

    Sadly, the other guys are right, the mainstream acceptance of video games is probably the most significant change of this decade. It's no co-incidence that it also coincides with the rapid decrease in quality and increase in quantity (sequels with less than 1 year dev cycle) of the majority of games.

      "Also, I really hate it when people emphasize that you can play with ‘anyone in the world’ when the reality is that you want to play with people in your region to reduce lag."

      Wow, very true. Good observation.
      Can't say I thought of it like that.

    "Denby Grace (Senior Producer, 2K Games): In my opinion the most useless advancement in gaming has to be motion controllers. I play games because I am: a) Too lazy and cannot be bothered to do the activities featured in the game for real, or b) simply because I have no access to military weapons, machine guns, swords and explosives etc. So the last thing I want to do is sit on my couch at home, in my pants wafting my pseudo sword at some elf that is hiding behind a rock."

    I love how he insults himself with point a) and point b) doesn't even contribute to his argument.

    Does he not like being in pants? What does he have against elves behind rocks?

    A few other 'iconic 2000's gaming trends'

    -Dark and gritty re-makes. More a trend of the 2000's movie industry, but still present in games like Splinter Cell: Conviction.

    -Brown on grey colour schemes (aka: gritty realism). See pretty much any COD game, or any game based in WW2. Actually, almost every major FPS of the decade (with the notable exception of TF2)

    -SANDBOX. SANDBOX. SAAAAAAAAAAAAAAANDDDDDDDDDBOOOOOOX. Seriously. Can developers just STOP making so many of these. We get it, sandbox games can be fun. They don't have to be the ONLY game. Linear is not as dirty of a word as most 'video game journalists' would have you think. Linear is fun if you do it right, just like sandbox can be not fun if you do it wrong.

    leave the dreamcast alone. Sega hardware R.I.P

    " It is an interesting evolution that some consoles are now accepted by families.”
    This has been the case since PONG and the Atari 2600, they were always pitched as family entertainment.
    Even the Atari 400/800 came with 4 joystick ports, it was meant to be a social activity and was. It was only later when cost cutting came in and the graphics got better that gaming evolved into a singular pursuit. The internet and Wii both brought the social aspect of gaming back again, along with singstar and rockband etc. made gaming a family activity again and accessible (again) by a wider audience.

    Cultural acceptance is probably the biggest thing imo.
    I never ever thought their would come a day when I went to a store to buy games for my mum and I did that this christmas.

    Almost all my family and friends play games on a platform in some capacity now, less than 8 years ago it was a completely different story.

Join the discussion!

Trending Stories Right Now