No, System Of A Down Did Not Make A Zelda Song. But This Guy Did.

Let's give a man his dues! For over a decade now, there's been a kinda-famous song about Zelda on the internet that many people believe was written and performed by System of a Down.

It wasn't.

The song, simply called Zelda, was actually written (and sung) by a man named Joe Pleiman. It was released in 1998 on an album called Rabbit Joint, by the band of the same name. Neither of which had anything to do with System of a Down.

So how'd this modern internet fallacy come to be? Over 10 years ago, the song was uploaded to Napster, in the wild days before the service was shut down and went straight. And it was uploaded simply as "SOAD - The Legend of Zelda", or "SOAD - Zelda". Given this was the early 2000's, many people assumed this meant it was perofrmed by System of a Down, particularly given the similarities between Pleiman's vocals and those of System's Serj Tankian.

The track, which is damn catchy, thus snowballed, and for millions of people System of a Down were given credit for a song they had no part in. Poor Joe. At least he can see the funny side of it, writing on his own website that the 1998 album featured "the song 'Zelda' as unintentionally made famous by System of a Down".

To make up for it, you could go to Joe's site and listen to some of his (and his band's) stuff. In 2003, he was in a band called Splinter, which released an album called Hip Tanaka. Which is an awesome thing to do.

If you've somehow never heard the song, check it out below.

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Comments

    I got a copy in 2001 that had Mike Patton as the artist. So when his band Fantomas toured and did a CD signing I got him and the band members to sign my Majoras Mask cartridge. His confused look made me confused as well. Still, they signed it as well as the bong of the guy next to me.

      not as lame as the time you asked the beastie boys to sign your morris minor and the majors LP!

      do... do you still have that cartridge? :)

        Still got it collecting dust with well worn N64 controllers.

          Cool cool, well if you're ever wanting to part with it lemme know.
          I have a mate that's a zelda/mike patton fan and he would lose his shit if he had that :)

    I remember downloading this off Ocremix years ago.

      Yeah, still play it to have a laugh.

    Who the hell would mistake that for System of a Down?

      Apparently a lot of people. I remember all through high school I would tell anyone who mentioned it, that it wasn't by SOAD. Yet you STILL see a majority of people on the internet being ignorant about it.

      You forget the days of Napster where the odds of a song being correctly attributed were amazingly slim.

      If you're bored enough, check out the TV Tropes page about this thing.

      In the days of limewire and kazaa and napster and what not, if a song was humourous, it would be attributed to Weird Al. Even if it would be things that he wouldn't write (mainly swearing and risque stuff) and it got to be such a big problem that someone actually made a website for it. Just look at these commonly misappropriated songs. Is that the right word? I don't know.
      (http://www.com-www.com/weirdal/notbyal.html is one such site, the one I was thinking of was more specific, but appears to be down)

      My point is, this sort of thing happens a lot more than you'd think.

      To be fair, the vocals actually sounded a hell of a lot like Serj from SOAD.....or atleast I remember them sounding like it.

    What exactly did the SOAD part mean?

      SOAD = S.ystem O.f A. D.own

        "Given this was the early 2000′s, many people assumed this meant it was perofrmed by System of a Down, particularly given the similarities between Pleiman’s vocals and those of System’s Serj Tankian."

        This implied it meant something else.

          It might have been a sort of SOAD copy. You know, made to sound like SOAD?

          It may well have meant SOAD, just in the sense that it was like something from SOAD, not SOAD in itself.

    People not getting it are too young. I downloaded this on Napster with my 56k modem and absolutely mistook it for SOAD.

    I remember seeing this listed as SOAD and Mr Bungle. Bungle seemed more likely, but doesn't sound shit like Patton.

    Ive got this song in my phone! Its definetly not SOAD, never did bother looking up who was behind it so thanks:)

    It's just like when people thought Cradle of Filth composed Castlevania's Bloody Tears.

    Or performed the rock arrangement.

    Is that the same recording of it in the video? Sounds way different to how I remember it :S

    Ugh. Yeah I remember back in high school playing this song while friends were over and this one guy was like "Oh man I love System of the Downs" and nearly facepalmed myself to death. It would have been bad enough, but when I corrected him on the band's name, he actually disputed that it wasn't them.

    I say again, ugh. People amaze me. Apart from a very vague similarity in the vocals, (maybe sounds like Serj's more light hearted stuff), it really isn't like them at all. No insanely overly distorted guitars, for one xD

      I think that the people who thought it was System of a Down, like me :-P, didn't think it was truly a full-fledged 'on-an-album-somewhere' song... it sounded more like a joke track or something they did while they were drunk in the studio that somehow leaked out onto the internet. So it wasn't odd that he sounded a bit light hearted and the arrangement was left undistorted and crazy haha

    I totally thought it was System of a Down :-P

    There was also a crappy live recording of a band playing the Imperial March that was supposedly 'No Doubt' with Gwen Stefani playing a kazoo... though I never really believed that one was as legit as the "SOAD - Zelda" song lol

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