He Took Refuge In Skyrim After His Sister's Death. Bethesda Sent Him This

Video games can be wonderful when you need someplace to decompress, when you need to tune the world out. That's exactly what Redditor lb-Cyber needed during a tough spot in his life.

"On February 21st, 2012, my sister passed away after a nine-year battle with cancer," lb-Cyber wrote in a Reddit thread. Dealing with the loss wasn't easy, as you might imagine. He had a "deep-rooted" depression and was feeling rather isolated and alone following the death.

So he used the outlets he could find, including Skyrim. It helped. He wrote a Reddit thread about the experience a month ago and Bethesda reached out. On the anniversary of the sibling's death, lb-Cyber received the art book you see above.

It was signed by all the members of the Bethesda team.

"I absolutely was floored, and a day I thought would be absolutely agonizing ended with an incredibly heart-warming and unexpected moment of absolute kindness," lb-Cyber wrote on the Reddit thread.

I wrote a silly post a month ago about how Skyrim helped me through a tough time. I didn't expect to receive such a touching response from Bethesda. [lb-Cyber]


Comments

    faith in humanity restored.

      Please allow me to destroy it for you again.

      http://www.kotaku.com.au/2013/02/the-lack-of-women-presenters-at-the-ps4-event-is-bigger-than-sony/

        Upako =/= Patricia.

    When I break into the industry I want to do things like this.

    Kudos to Bethesda

      Yep!.. really capitalising on those advertisement opportunities granted by person dying

        Did Bethesda advertise they did this? Was there a press release? If so, then maybe your comment is correct. Otherwise, your cynical attitude makes me lose faith in humanity.

          Not Humanity because not all humans are like that loose faith in him

        Jesus christ, the hells your problem about this? They do something heartfelt, someone took mental and emotional refuge in something they created and they showed their own appreciation, sorrow and gratitude towards it by doing this. If anything they were completely humbled by it.

        No wonder our worlds going to shit, there's people like you in it.

        Last edited 25/02/13 12:28 am

          Hm, soft-hearted people around here, and I thought this was the Aussie site. I'm sorry my emotional playing field isn't as level as yours but perhaps that's because you haven't had to watch someone close to you slowly die. I guess my point = kudos to Bethesda. Their actions in reaching out to this person who publicly announced his use of Skyrim as an outlet leaves in some observers the notion that Bethesda are deserving of kudos. This is advertising intentional or not. Have you heard the phrase no publicity is bad publicity? I don't really have a problem I just don't think showing empathy deserves great accolades, it's supposed to be the standard reaction isn't it? If anything I thought the fact that it took a year unto the day of the anniversary of the death to have this book signed and posted.. to arrive just at the right time seemed slightly morbid actually as if it was a planned publicity stunt, though I'm not quite cynical enough to believe that yet.

            Did you not read that article properly? The man involved wrote about his experience a month ago. Not. A. Year. A month ago. Bethesda sent out that book on the anniversary of his sister's death. They didn't make any announcement about it, Ib-Cyber did. Not Bethesda.

            Now, there's losing faith in humanity and being cynical, and then there's trying to destroy everyone else's faith in humanity. Which are you doing? No offence, but you're acting like you're the only one who's lost someone and had to handle it, and are judging all involved and drawing the worst conclusions possible.

              Huh, guess I didn't read that part properly, disregard my idle speculation on timing as pertains to conspiracy theories. My fault, I saw anniversary and not month and went from there.. Then again it's a Patricia article and I usually only skim to get the gist of her writing for my own sanity. Anyway, like I said I don't believe it was a planned stunt, in truth I don't believe Grandstaff and his mates are assholes on the scale it'd take to seriously make a gesture like this for any reason other than they assert.

              I'd never be stupid or self-conceited enough to think I'm the only person that has ever lost someone, that'd be insane. I don't think I judged anyone beyond making an off colour remark about a frankly implausible sinister side to Bethesda's gesture. If that purely imagined dishonesty from Bethesda could cause someone to loose faith in humanity or my own tongue-in-cheek comment seemed remotely like a reasonable motive for a companies (or at least Bethesda's) actions in the real world then they probably didn't have much to begin with. There is no one else in the equation for me to have judged unfairly. Infact I'm the one that was called out for destroying folks faith in humanity over a one-liner. That seems pretty weak to me.

              I still believe that granting kudos for displaying empathy isn't really neccesary though.

            When your shit doesn't work as it should, that's publicity as well, and it's bad publicity.

            A topical issue: Processed meat in Europe. People are finding that 100% beef can be, in some cases, 100% horse. Big scandal, products recalled, people aren't buying processed meat of any sort if they can help it. Tonnes of mince beef is now going to waste, which I expect leads to negative effects for everyone.

            Bad publicity can be just that, don't make tired generalisations.

        See, the problem is you have absolutely no idea of the true motivation and intention behind sending this gift, no idea at all. All you can really do as a bystander is stand on the sideline and guess. Now it's entirely plausible they did it as an advertising opportunity and it's entirely plausible they did it out of the goodness of their heart. But you don't know this, you really have no idea.

        But you're intent on stressing to people that they don't deserve 'great accolades' over this, despite the fact that no one has proposed 'great accolades' for this act. All that was bestowed in these comments was a thumbs up mate, a simple 'good show Bethesda', a simple kudos. But, not content with assigning your own motivations to Bethesdas gesture, you need to then assign intent to the commenters.

        The problem is you think you have people figured out. You think you know why Bethesda did this and you think people's reactions to this line up with your own cynicism.

        You're bitter.

        Why? Sounds like someone close to you died. And that changes you, it hangs a cold reality on your shoulders. You've tasted the grim nature of life and you're out to give people a reality check that life isn't all sunshine amd rainbows. No one did anything that special for you when your close friend or family member died and you want people to know this beautiful act from bethesda isn't all it's cracked up to be.

        Don't.

        People die, my dad almost bled out in front of me and I watched him die in hospital. Life is fucking cruel. But don't let that blind you from the beautiful things in life, even the caring act of a corporation. If you've been through something terrible you should learn to better appreciate the more positive things in life.

          See, the problem is you have absolutely no idea of the true motivation and intention behind sending this gift, no idea at all. All you can really do as a bystander is stand on the sideline and guess. Now it's entirely plausible they did it as an advertising opportunity and it's entirely plausible they did it out of the goodness of their heart. But you don't know this, you really have no idea.

          Indeed, it'd be somewhat arrogant to think you know what another person is thinking wouldn't it ..

          But you're intent on stressing to people that they don't deserve 'great accolades' over this, despite the fact that no one has proposed 'great accolades' for this act. All that was bestowed in these comments was a thumbs up mate, a simple 'good show Bethesda', a simple kudos. But, not content with assigning your own motivations to Bethesdas gesture, you need to then assign intent to the commenters.

          On a gaming website I'd think words used in hyperbole would be understandable. I merely meant 'great accolades' to mean 'kudos.'

          The problem is you think you have people figured out. You think you know why Bethesda did this and you think people's reactions to this line up with your own cynicism.

          You're bitter.

          Why? Sounds like someone close to you died. And that changes you, it hangs a cold reality on your shoulders. You've tasted the grim nature of life and you're out to give people a reality check that life isn't all sunshine amd rainbows. No one did anything that special for you when your close friend or family member died and you want people to know this beautiful act from bethesda isn't all it's cracked up to be.

          See above for 'somewhat arrogant' You're making alot of assumtions on my part here but that's cool. I have to say I think you're totally offbase imagining Bethesda's actions and the commenter's reactions line up with my own cynicism, conversely, with my cynicism highlighting the discrepancy in our reactions at the fore I found something to laugh about in a sorrowful situation.

          In a way social interaction is all about figuring people out isn't it? Otherwise why communicate with each other at all? Even the basest of interaction demands you figure the others current state of mind and how it compares to your own, to the best of your ability. We as humans are born with these gifts. I'd say it's probably better to attempt to figure people's motives before they are made plainly and horribly clear to you, just in case.

          I'm not totally bitter, but I do seem to be less emotionally invested in things than some people seem to be. Guess I'm just a sociopath, perhaps for various reasons but not because I lost a loved one and it changed me, that's just a part of life and everyone is sure to understand at some point that life isn't always butterflies and candy, I don't need to be the one handing out reality checks. Reality takes care of that adequately.

          I have no intention of discussing the details of my personal losses but I will say that, in a once more cynical tone, if a game company wanted to send me stuff because I used their game as an escape I might be a little nonplussed that some dudes who don't know me felt the need to

          Don't.

          People die, my dad almost bled out in front of me and I watched him die in hospital. Life is fucking cruel. But don't let that blind you from the beautiful things in life, even the caring act of a corporation. If you've been through something terrible you should learn to better appreciate the more positive things in life.

          Well, that's horrible to hear and sorry for your loss.

          'caring act of a corporation' is precisely along the lines I was chuckling about when I made my original comment

            eh, screwed up the italics tags

            Well written. My analysis of your personal reaction was a bit of a deliberate exercise in hypocrisy since I more or less scolded you for doing just that. So I'm glad the iony wasn't lost on you.

            I don't believe corporations have a caring heart, I'm always immediately cynical or corporate/charity relationships, but I do believe they are potentially filled with individuals that do have a caring heart. Individuals who are comfortable using their stations to help a stranger. I'm married to one such person. My wife will make me stop the car to go and comfort a crying person, she'll even buy a flower for a visually exhausted checkout-chick. That's why I'm always willing to see the best in people, because I know there are better people than me out there.

    Fallout 3, Mass Effect 3, and Bioshock 2, were of some solace to me after a loss in my family... but in retrospect, those may not have been the best choice because:
    in Fallout 3 and Bioshock 2, Dad dies - and in ME3, Shephard dies.
    My Fallout 3 character didn't get nice digs like that lodge in Skyrim; but I took to filling up the Megaton house with lots of teddy bears that were found in the wastes.

      I understand what you're saying, but it's more about what you can just lose yourself in. I didn't lose anyone to death so please understand it's definitely *not* on the same scale, but when I broke up with someone I loved dearly, due to something stupid I did, I remember doing the same with Red Dead Redemption. I just played and played for weeks. I just absolutely lost myself in that game.

      That teddybear thing is sweet :) I just shot coyotes lol.

      Last edited 24/02/13 9:43 pm

        I think the point is that may be more difficult to lose yourself in a game that prominently features a story about losing your dad, searching for him, finding him and then helplessly watching him die if you have just lost someone yourself

    I know exactly how he felt after my mum died of a 6 year battle with cadacil, I found my escape in Project Zero on the Xbox, it was a lifesaver

    The next time a video game gets blamed for a high school shooting they should mention this.

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