Here's One Developer Who Embraces Piracy

Sean Hogan, one of the two guys behind the delightful Anodyne, is not Electronic Arts. He's not Ubisoft, either. Or Activision.

He is instead a man who, like Hotline Miami's Jonatan Soderstrom, isn't terribly concerned with people pirating his game.

Sure, he doesn't exactly have billions of dollars riding on his multinational business like big publishers, but his stance is still one worth looking at.

"Yeah, piracy is inevitable so it's better to embrace it - plus, it gives lots of people who couldn't normally afford the game the opportunity to play it - and I think when you're a small group of developers (only my friend Jon and I made Anodyne), it's better to have lots of people able to experience your game", he said on Reddit (via GI.biz). "We hope enough people will like it and the word will get out, eventually allowing us to get onto Steam, which then lets more people see and play Anodyne!"

Interestingly, despite Hogan's enthusiasm, the game has very recently been removed from torrent site The Pirate Bay, a move he says has nothing to do with the developers.

Anodyne dev: It's better to embrace piracy [GI.biz]


Comments

    "Sean Hogan, one of the two guys behind the delightful Anodyne, is not Electronic Arts. He’s not Ubisoft, either. Or Activision."

    He doesn't have shareholders, or hundreds of employees, or other corporate responsibilities.

      "He doesn't have shareholders, or hundreds of employees, or other corporate responsibilities."

      You make it sound like it's a bad thing......

        Meh. 50/50?

        Small, low money studios can churn out amazing things and not have to worry about profits or investors, or publishers, etc.

        Big studios do.

        Love or loathe AAA studious and games, I'd prefer my games aren't all RPG-Maker based going forward.

          Actually he may worry more about profits...his entire company rests on one game being successful whereas EA or activision can easily ride through one or 2 games with average sales...

            Or, if he's a true blue developer, he'll look at the low income and think, "Oh, game didn't turn out well - I'm gonna make another one and learn from this!"

            As for the big AAA publishers, "RAAAAAGE! Our game is not making mega profits! Tighten the DRM and scape goat the used game market!"

    If independent developers such as Hogan and Soderstrom don't mind piracy, why not adopt a "Pay what you want" ideal?

    It's tried and tested, and people tend to react positively.

    If the price of a game is directly linked to it's quality, and especially in the cases of games such as Hotline Miami, then the $10 I paid for my copy was genuinely some of the best money I've ever spent.

    Also can someone tell me why Firefox wants to correct 'Soderstrom' to 'Masterstroke' ?

    Last edited 13/02/13 2:20 pm

      Has there been an instance where a developer has adopted a "pay what you want" scheme for a game that wasn't also for charity (such as the Humble Indie Bundles) and had this be successful for them? I'd love to think so, but I unfortunately am not aware of any.

        Sure has!
        Just last year Mc'Pixel developer Mikolaj Kaminski had a "Pay what you want" weekend, with links to an official torrent hosted on The Pirate Bay for users to "Try before you buy"

        Not sure of the sales stats from that weekend, though.

        And if you check out the Mc'Pixel website, there's actually a "Big Thank You" to TPB near the bottom of the purchasing page.

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