The Closest Thing To An HD Remake Of Super Mario 64

The original Super Mario 64 was made 18 years ago. But if it was being developed today? It might look a bit like this.

The footage above, which shows a more realistic, modern take on Super Mario 64, is actually a fan-made remake of the original. The project is being developed by aryoksini in the Blender game engine, and while it's not done you can already see that many of Mario's signature moves are in place. Pretty cool!

You can stay on top of the game's development, including in-progress features and crazy ideas that may or may not make it into the final game (like multiplayer and Oculus Rift support), here.

Super Mario 64 Fan Remake - VLog1 - Blender Game Engine [aryoksini]


Comments

    It will be free to play right? Otherwise I see a cease and desist on the horizon

    Closest thing to "AN HD" Mario remake? Just curious, is that grammatically correct? I though an goes before wovels only?

      it depends if you're pronouncing "H" as "aitch" or "haitch",

        Interesting bit of useless info.

        I always assumed the difference between aitch and haitch was a clear grammatical error. Before I came to Australia (from NZ, so not that far removed) I had never heard H pronounced as Haitch, so it used to drive me insane when I heard it. I assumed it was bad habits prevailing through the generations.

        Was surprised to learn the difference comes from two distinct parties who historically played a part in what is now a fairly "united" country, the Catholics and Protestants. The Irish accent played it's part in spreading the "Haitch" usage.

        Years later it has simply become 6 of one and half a dozen of the other.

          Removing the H from Haitch is like removing the A from ay, IT DOESN'T LOGIC EVEN.

            No, removing H from Haitch is how you pronounce the letter in English. Haitch is only accepted because it's become so widespread.

      It's really much of a muchness. Some people use "an" before H words all the time, which sounds stupid in my opinion, but there are many H words which sound better with an "an".

      An historical account of an honest person. A historical account of a honest person. A historical account of an honest person. I like the sound of the last one better because the h in honest is silent.

      I was writing the initialism "FPS" the other day, and it felt more correct to write it as "an FPS" because F is pronounced "eff"...but I just couldn't do it, so I wrote "a FPS" instead. Still feel like I made the wrong call on that one. :D

      Haha, English is a funny language.

        The word hour always causes me stress. A hour just sounds so completely wrong although technically correct.

          I don't think it is technically correct? I'm pretty sure it's "an hour" because the h is silent. An hour sounds better to me, so it's what I use anyway.

          Also, there are some people who will get really strict about the English language, but they forget that languages are constantly shifting and evolving, and what is common use will often eventually become the correct way as well. The invention of the printing press certainly slowed down the evolution of English, but it's still progressing and changing over time.

          So I say: Use what sounds right, and if you can't find a word for something, invent one!

            That's right. I completely forgot about silent letters. Also isn't there like at least 3 different versions of English?

            I guess it's more like how you put it. More based of sounds and silent letters. Thanks for that, it makes more sense.

            I might not (most likely not(definitely not)) be technically correct. I've just always assumed the h isn't completely silent since hour and our are different pronunciations.

            I hate English. Mathematics is so much easier.

            Last edited 18/03/14 1:25 pm

              hehe, I pronounce hour and our the same :)

              Maths is awesome because you know when it's right, but sometimes English is awesome precisely because it has a bit of wiggle room.

              I always love (technically correct) sentences like this:
              "All the faith he had had had had no effect on the outcome of his life."

              and believe it or not:
              "James while John had had had had had had had had had had had a better effect on the teacher"

              is also technically correct (but just so stupid that it hurts).

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_while_John_had_had_had_had_had_had_had_had_had_had_had_a_better_effect_on_the_teacher

              Silent just means that that specific letter is not pronounced, not that it has no effect on pronunciation. For example, win and wine are pronounced much more differently than hour/our, but the e is still silent. Unless you pronounce wine oddly. *suspicious*

      Australians have a tendency to pronounce "H" as "Haytch" instead of "Aytch". The 'proper' pronunciation makes it sound like a word starting with a vowel. English is pretty broken from the ground up, so I think it's one of those things that ends up being either/or.

      We use "an" to make speaking easier. Any other use for it is kind of just because we are taught to. "An apple" rolls nicely, but "A apple" forces you to come to a hard stop in the middle of a phrase.

      'an' goes before any word that phonetically starts with a vowel sound.

      Acronyms often fall under this rule.. for example "an FAQ section" or "A frequently asked questions section"

      I think it depends on how you pronounce HD, because that affects how the sentence sounds when spoken. I pronounce it in a way that sounds like it starts with "eigh" from "eight" ("eigh-ch" with a silentish H), in which case it sounds broken when you try to say a HD, because you have to insert a forced and uncomfortable pause between the "a" and "H", where as "an" makes for a smoother sentence. Now, if you pronounced it with a hard H, then saying "an" would be wrong. However, most people I meet say it with a silent H, in which case an is more appropriate.

      The whole "an" for vowels only isn't quite a hard rule, as more of a rule of thumb that's meant to help us understand the language before we learn about all the complicated shit you do with changing how each letter sounds in each case. "A" versus "An" has a lot less to do with the literal letter proceeding it than the [b]sound[/b] proceeding it.

    pass... its too dark and awkward looking...

      Reminds me of the 3D maze screensaver on Windows 95.

        hahahaha... on shit you're right i see it now :P lol

    No doubt there will be a cease and desist if this gets any bigger, you're not allowed to use a copyrighted IP, even for free to play. And he sucks at texturing :P

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