XCOM's Creator Wants To Make A New Strategy Game

XCOM's Creator Wants To Make A New Strategy Game

Julian Gollop, the Bulgaria-based designed best known for creating the original XCOM game, has just launched a Kickstarter for a new "wizard tactics" game called Chaos Reborn.

Wizard tactics! Awesome. Here's Gollop describing the game:

Based on my cult classic ZX Spectrum game 'Chaos', first published in 1985 by Games Workshop, Chaos Reborn is part sequel, part re-imagining of that original game brought up-to-date with high quality presentation. The magic combat system remains true to the original Chaos.

It is all about summoning a host of weird and mythical creatures, moving and fighting with them, and using your wizard to attack, defend, buff and de-buff with large array of spells. It is highly tactical and fast paced. But Chaos Reborn expands considerably on this by offering multiplayer modes, a single-player RPG system and co-op play.

They're looking for $US180,000 and aiming for a May 2015 release, which means, because this is Kickstarter, it will be out in 2016. Gollop has experience and pedigree, though, and this game sounds quite cool. Check out the Kickstarter for more info.


Comments

    Anyone else tired of kickstater? These people are getting free money in a risk free environment. If I invest in any other business I get a cut of their profits.

      Except that if they don't provide the promised rewards, backers have recourse to sue them. Not quite the same as free money.

      For the Kickstarter projects that I've backed, I've received the end product at a discount. It seems a lot closer to a pre-order system than an investment in the company, and you don't expect Activision to give you a share of their products just because you pre-ordered Call of Duty.

        Preordering has the option of cancelation with complete money back. No risk. You can call it what you want though at the end of the day you are entering a high risk investment with no returns.

        Show me a case where some one has successfully sued a failed kickstarter.

          I'm not arguing that crowd funding is risk free (there clearly is risk, and you're told so when backing a campaign). The risk might be considered worthwhile given the discount on the end-product, or the fact that the product might not ever be produced without the crowd funding campaign.

          I think you're over-estimating the risks of crowd funding and under-estimating those of traditional bricks-and-mortar retail pre-orders, lay-by schemes, etc. People losing money from pre-pay schemes is nothing new, as some GAME customers probably remember.

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