Gigantic LEGO Star Destroyer Is Pretty Much Perfect

Gigantic LEGO Star Destroyer Is Pretty Much Perfect

SNOT is a building term in LEGO that stands for "Studs Not On Top". It can be a pain to plan, but the results - which hide the brick's trademark studs - are often worth it. Especially when you're building a Star Destroyer that's over two metres long.

Gigantic LEGO Star Destroyer Is Pretty Much Perfect

This behemoth was put together by Jerac, and while it looks amazing from a distance, it looks even better up close, because the SNOT method makes it look more like a model kit than a LEGO build.

Jerac [Flickr, via Brothers Brick]

Gigantic LEGO Star Destroyer Is Pretty Much Perfect
Gigantic LEGO Star Destroyer Is Pretty Much Perfect
Gigantic LEGO Star Destroyer Is Pretty Much Perfect

Comments

    OMG, I would pay serious money and put serious time into building that.

    Now get out some of the black and metallic blue and build the Super Star Destroyer!

    There is some of the SNOT method used here, but mostly its just tiles pieces. Still an amazing kit

    Lego has star wars, mega bloks has halo, both with BRILLIANT starships to construct & do what if situations with, *mouth watering at sight of the big star destroyer*

      You know you're allowed to build Halo stuff with Lego if you want to, right?

    HOW? I mean, do they modify Lego pieces? Or is this an actual kit? It blows my freakin' mind. Admittedly I haven't played with Lego since 1990 so I'm oblivious to the stuff they have these days but fuh-hukkkk

      This is not a pre purchased kit, and usually no modifications to the pieces themselves are made. If you google Lego SNOT there is a whole site about the building techniques. Although this is mostly achieved through tile pieces which are smooth on the top on purpose

      Last edited 02/06/14 11:55 pm

    Squeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

    It looks incredible, I shudder to think how much money there must be in that though :S

      I had to go several links deep to find the stats sheet - http://brickology.blogspot.com.au/2014/06/of-cosmic-proportions.html

      Apparently around $5,000 (40,000 pieces).

    That's a mighty impressive effort. Would hate to know how much money and time went into that.

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