Sunday Comics: A Mortal Kombat Policy

Sunday Comics: A Mortal Kombat Policy

Welcome to Kotaku's Sunday Comics, your weekly roundup of the best webcomics. The images enlarge if you click on the magnifying glass icon.

Sunday Comics: A Mortal Kombat Policy

Nerf NOW!! by Josué Pereira. Published July 25. Read more of Nerf NOW!!


Blow The Cartridge by Cameron Davis. Read more of Blow The Cartridge

Sunday Comics: A Mortal Kombat Policy

Awkward Zombie by Katie Tiedrich. Published July 21. Read more of Awkward Zombie


Sunday Comics: A Mortal Kombat Policy

Penny Arcade by Jerry Holkins and Mike Krahulik. Published July 21. Read more of Penny Arcade


Sunday Comics: A Mortal Kombat Policy

Brawl In The Family by Matthew Taranto. Published July 25. Read more of Brawl In The Family


Sunday Comics: A Mortal Kombat Policy

Nerd Rage by Andy Kluthe. Published July 25. Read more of Nerd Rage


Sunday Comics: A Mortal Kombat Policy

Corpse Run by Alex Di Stasi. Published July 24. Read more of Corpse Run


Sunday Comics: A Mortal Kombat Policy

Manly Guys Doing Manly Things by Kelly Turnbull. Published July 21. Read more of Manly Guys Doing Manly Things


Sunday Comics: A Mortal Kombat Policy

Life in Aggro by Fei Hsiao and Casey Vasquez. Published July 25. Read more of Life in Aggro


Sunday Comics: A Mortal Kombat Policy

ActionTrip by Borislav Grabovic and Uros Pavlovic. Published July 26. Read more of ActionTrip


Sunday Comics: A Mortal Kombat Policy

Double XP by M.S. Corley and Josh Crandall. Published July 21. Read more of Double XP

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Comments

    Brawl in the Family ending is sad, but the Life in Aggro comic kind of made up for it.

    i realise that the PA comic is nothing more than a way to introduce another one of their "guest artist" weeks, but on its own merit, that's a really shitty and inappropriate couple of panels showing him to have a basic inability to talk to his own son about sex.

      I'm not seeing the inappropriateness myself.

        Really? Read it again: A young son has come to his own father to ask about "where babies come from" despite obviously asking before and getting told "from wizards", yet he tries once again to ask his own father, and rather than being a decent parent, he suggests a "carousel of strangers" to explain it to his own child.

          Yet variations of that conversation happen in many homes on a common basis, even the part where parents will get someone else to talk to their child rather than face it themselves. It's more or less a satire.

          Last edited 28/07/14 7:26 pm

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