This FPS Art Exhibit Has Giant Graphics Cards, Duke Nukem's Pistol

We've talked a lot about games as art... but what about games in art? Artist Aram Bartholl decided to have a go with his recent installation, called "Hurt me plenty", which features massive video cards, hard drives, tiny passwords and the handgun from Duke Nukem 3D.

"Hurt me plenty" is an exhibition currently running at the DAM Gallery in Berlin, Germany. It's been open since 13 September and will end on 1 November. The clip takes us on a "private tour", with Bartholl himself explaining his various works.

Along with the aforementioned pistol, Bartholl also went to the trouble of printing Duke's "idle hands" animation on wood, with the resulting piece appropriated named "What are you waiting for?".

From there it starts getting more experimental, with passwords printed on paper in such a way as to be invisible from a distance, but readable up close and a series of phones showing videos of people on planes... playing games on their phones.

I'm not sure what the take-away is here, but it was nice to see visual relics from good old Duke Nukem 3D in the flesh. Well, the wood.

Private tour of 'Hurt me plenty' [YouTube, via MAKE]


Comments

    Artists should never comment on their own work, every time I see an artist "explanation" or similar at an art exhibition I'm immediately hit with the realization that they actually have no fucking clue what they are doing... It seems like he has just jumping on a hot topic, in this case "Are games art?" without actually knowing the source material very well.

    Dear god, does this guy even know anything about games?

    Do copyright laws have any legitimacy here, like.. can you just rip sprites out of games, print them and present them as an art exhibit? I'd be interested to know the laws regarding this kind of thing, I'm sure there's an expansive grey area.

    Bunnings displays tools openly, I thought it was attempting to sell them, now I realise it's art.

    How is this art?

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