Real Life Archer Who Got His Start LARPing Is Now Superhero Good

Slightly off-topic, but wow! So we've seen real life archers with unbelievable skills before. Lars Andersen though? He's on another level... likely somewhere superhero-ish.

This post was originally published on Gizmodo Australia.

Andersen isn't just showing off, the clip is also educational, debunking various myths about archery. He originally got his start when he took it up for LARPing (live action roleplaying), but so interested was he in the art of the arrow that he began to research various techniques in old manuscripts and historical texts.

Along the way Andersen learned a few tidbits about how archers operated back in the day before bullets were a thing. For one, Andersen believes quivers are impractical, especially for the archer on the move. A bow-wielder is better off keeping his or her ammunition in hand and reusing whatever your opponents happen to sling your way.

Despite what you may think after seeing Andersen in action, there's no magic involved, just talent:

"Many people have accused me of being fake or have theories on how there's cheating involved. I've always found it fascinating how human it is, to want to disbelieve anything that goes against our world view -- even when it's about something as relatively neutral as archery."

That doesn't stop him from boasting (and rightfully so) about his abilities:

Lars has studied and practised, and he is now able to fire three arrows in 0.6 seconds –- a truly stunning feat making him much faster than the legendary fictional archer Legolas (played by Orlando Bloom in the Lord of the Rings movies).

Not even his friends are safe:

"At one of our combat archery tournaments last year, I ended up in a one-on-one duel against a friend. Every time he shot an arrow at me, I'd shoot it out of the air with one of my own. After five arrows, he just gave up in good-natured disgust. Sure, it was showing off, but it was also a lot of fun!"

Lars Andersen: a new level of archery [YouTube, via The Awesomer]


Comments

    As per the reddit discussion there are lot of issues with lars historical claims and then the way uses the bow as well. also the shooting the other arrow portion seems to be at unusually slow speeds, and something seems off with the catching the arrow clip also. plus hasn't the splitting of arrows been debunked somewhere else also?

    http://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/2tes7c/the_periodically_popular_lars_anderson_master/

      I'll interject with "I've just found my new favourite subreddit" :)

    Shame there's no like button, this was unreal.

    Last edited 24/01/15 8:13 pm

    Looks awesome but it's all very misleading (and slightly worrying that I've seen it posted heaps today).
    The reason people aim with one eye, on the opposite side has nothing to do with Hollywood, it's a matter of safety. I have actually seen people aimin/shooting the way he does (There's a technical name for it but I can't remember, it's more popular in hunting) but it's generally considered terrible because if there's a problem with an arrow, you'll probably lose an eye.

    He also seems to be trying to show how much better ancient archery is than modern recurve bow archery (i.e. Olympic standards) at moving targets (or hitting a target while moving) - essentially hunting. Except most people who hunt use Compund bows, which he completely ignored.

    Another thing he says is quivers are only used because of Hollywood and they're crap while moving (he demonstrated this by running and jumping around with an ordinary back quiver - ignoring that most people these days tend to use leg quivers, because the real world isn't Hollywood like he thinks it is).

    That said any quiver isn't perfect if you plan to go running/hunting with your bow, so he then spends years learning how to hold spare arrows while firing? Yeah I guess you could... Or you could just buy something like this:
    http://blog.thecrossbowstore.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/pic-1.jpg
    A tiny bit slower to draw I guess but much safer and easier then holding them while shooting.

    It'd be like saying 'I studied ancient images and texts on ancient writing impliments, now I take all my notes on stone slabs with a chisel.' then trying to work out how to carry your stone-slab shopping list to the car.
    Advances in technology and procedures usually happen for a reason, we don't just do things 'because the movies did it.'

    Last edited 24/01/15 9:07 pm

      But still, you can't deny that he's owning basically every other archer out there, while just using the most basic and traditional equipment. I think that's friggin amazeballs!

        Oh yeah credit where it's due, he's insanely good (that last shot is ridiculous) - just not very safe or practical :P

      One of them quivers came on my pse brute-x I bought a few years ago when I started shooting again. Can't stand the bloody thing, getting arrows in and out of it is an absolute pita.

      I think you're missing the point here. The whole point WAS to show that its significantly better to employ the proper ancient techniques that master archers used to use, and to debunk some of the myths about ancient/medieval archery.
      Why would he go on about compound bows? They are a modern bow, entirely NOT the point of the video.

      And about the quivers, he only said that quivers on your BACK are a myth and completely useless. We know archers wore their quivers on their legs, most ancient text or treatise will show this (or of course, holding your arrows with your hands). He's showing that there is a reason these types of PROPER techniques were used for thousands of years. Of course he's going to spend years learning how to hold arrows while firing, because that's what archers used to do. Again, the whole point of the video.

      Just in the same way that there is a reason there are PROPER techniques for fencing with a longsword, sword and buckler etc.

      And I have not seen an archer using our advances in bow technology to shoot the way this guy does. HE is a master archer, using master archers techniques that were employed for thousands of years.

    He'd sure do well in a medieval age. Everyone would want to hire him.

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