Satellite Reign: The Kotaku Review

Satellite Reign: The Kotaku Review

I'd been led to believe that Satellite Reign was a modern-day Syndicate. Turns out it isn't. Phew.

I mean, I love Syndicate as much as the next person who loves Syndicate, in that I grew up thinking it was one of the best games of all time. I still find its filthy, cyberpunk art style to be among the best in video games, regardless of its age.

But let's be real: Syndicate has not, visuals aside, aged very well. It's confusingly frantic and brutal as fuck, and that's before you get to the point where it sucker punches you with one of the word endings in video games.

So a game that that's "Like Syndicate, only prettier" is not something I would have enjoyed. I have, however, been thoroughly enjoying Satellite Reign.

The Syndicate comparisons are there, of course. Satellite Reign is set in a cyberpunk city, you control a team of cyborg agents, the viewpoint is isometric and there are civilians everywhere. There's a very clear respect and admiration for Bullfrog's classic in almost everything that this game does. But it's where Satellite Reign differs from the subject of its love letter that things get more interesting.

Satellite Reign: The Kotaku Review

The first thing you notice is that your units can be attached to the terrain and take cover, XCOM-style (above). You can do this when controlling them individually (and yes, you can complete missions with a single agent if you want) or as a group. It's useful for combat, but also for stealth, as it lets you hide and avoid guard patrols.

The next thing a Syndicate fan will pick up on is an even bigger change: this new game is open world. There are no truncated levels. Instead, the action takes place across a massive future metropolis, which is split into a few regions to which you're slowly introduced. Here's the map:

Satellite Reign: The Kotaku Review

It doesn't look that big here, but maps can be misleading. This isn't a driving game, so ignore the limited road network. Let's take a closer look....

Satellite Reign: The Kotaku Review

...Enhance.

Satellite Reign: The Kotaku Review

...Enhance.

Satellite Reign: The Kotaku Review

There we go. See all those little lines ? Those are walkways, and stairs, and walls, and barricades, and clearings, and marketplaces. You can walk in and around most of these. It's a grimy labyrinth of urban design, and it's an absolute joy to explore. You'll feel like a kid playing with the most badass action figures you could ever have owned, set atop the biggest playset your imagination could handle.

Despite the presence of very generous fast travel beacons, there's just something satisfying about trudging through this city, hiding your agents amongst crowds of civilians and walking past enemy guards unnoticed. This isn't a game that's 100% action; shooting only starts when you draw weapons or enter a secure compound, and even then, you can make GTA-like getaways by running and hiding (complete with Satellite Reign's own "wanted star" system).

Satellite Reign: The Kotaku Review

Just don't expect there to be much to do with this city. Just because it's an open world doesn't mean this is Los Santos 2276: you can jack some ATMs and door controls, enter a few buildings and some elevators, ride a few ziplines and... that's it. If you were hoping for interesting conversations with NPCs, distracting games of cyber-poker or visits to robo strip clubs, you're outta luck.

Satellite Reign is a surprisingly tactical experience. Each of your agents is a specialist, and the big map and environmental controls mean that you can approach your objectives in any number of ways. The game supports the old-fashioned run-and-gun, and that's an enjoyable enough way to go, but the real pleasure comes from splitting your team up and executing complex stealth infiltrations and takedowns.

Satellite Reign's ambition and technical achievement don't come without some flaws. A high profile product of Steam's Early Access system, it feels like the game is still not quite there, a project needing a few more months of fine-tuning and polish when it comes to the little details expected of a game at final release.

Satellite Reign: The Kotaku Review

Example: As fantastic as the city itself is, and as fun and expressive as the missions can get (you really can tackle them any way you like), the story driving it all is a sterile thing, presented solely through briefing screens and checklists of tasks. Amidst a long session playing the game, the dry story stuff can make things feel like a bit of a grind.

The AI can also be messed up, or at least it was in the build I was playing for review, which wasn't quite the same as that which will be available on August 28. Sometimes it worked wonderfully, with guards swarming around me, taking cover and calling for reinforcements. Other times they got stuck in open gates and left cover to stand right in front of my gun barrels. This unpredictability made combat, which should have been a consistent and taxing affair, often as much about dumb luck as it was about tactics.

A lot has changed since Syndicate was released, and I'm glad Satellite Reign's designers had the sense to change with the times. Cyberpunk cityscapes and cyborg agents were all well and good in 1993, but 2015 needed something a little slower and a little smarter.

Satellite Reign: The Kotaku Review

Comments

    Thankyou for putting play buttons on GIF's.

      This, multiplied by two billion.

        Indeed. I actually really like all the use of GIFs but having them constantly playing could be a bit memory taxing and distracting when you're trying to read a paragraph nested between 2 things repeating over and over :P

          Yes! I would usually look at it, then scroll so it was just off screen and continue reading. Having another one below was so annoying!

      And not loading the actual gif until you click it. My quota thanks you Kotaku for not forcing me to download 30MB or more to view a page.

      People have been complaining for a long time, and it seems they've listened.

      Props to Kotaku.

    No useful information on HLTB yet, anybody know what kind of timeframe this game would take to finish? $35-40 (depending on conversion) suggests that it could be bigger and longer than I had originally anticipated.

    I am that guy that prefers longer games, so I'm just curious to know if I should spend coin or not.

      Not sure how long it is, but the pace changes really rapidly depending on playstyle. It's significantly shorter if you're running in guns blazing. Using your skills to avoid direct confrontation slows it all down a heap. Playing strategically like that is a lot of fun and so far all the missions I've done have felt like they were designed with that style of gameplay in mind. It's not like Watch Dogs where they give you a bunch of tools for stealth but build the encounters assumin you're just going to shoot your way out.

    I'm a KS backer.. maybe I'll get around to playing the game on the weekend. Seems like it's at least in a playable state now.

    One thing that comes up a lot in noob question threads is about whether there is a "pause to issue commands" feature. No.. there is not. That was how the original Syndicate was too. It's real-time through and through.

    I've been avoiding playing it until a retail level release, so I've only clocked up about four hours total playtime, but what's really impressing me is that this doesn't feel like an indie/crowdfunded game. There is room for improvement in most areas but it doesn't feel like they cut corners. It doesn't feel like they used their sources of inspiration as an excuse to cover for their low budget the way many low budget retro inspired games do. It doesn't feel like the art guy had to learn how to do the mapping to save money. The features are well thought out and have purpose rather than just copying Syndicate. It doesn't feel like they went 'oh, we don't have the budget to do more with this feature, but we can leave it half done because people are more forgiving of low budget games or because the Syndicate games had the same flaw'.
    Even the low budget stuff feels professionally low budget. It's not surprising given the team behind the game is an actual group of professionals, however due to the game being lumped in with Kickstarter and Early Access titles I think it's worth pointing out.

    Why is half this review about the size of the map? I mean, really, we know roughly how big a road is. What about the user interface? The audio? Things that actually matter? I feel like I know absolutely nothing new about the game. To quote Comic Book Guy, worst. review. ever.

    Is this the game from the Queensland based development team who featured on Good Games a couple of years ago?

      Yes, 5 Lives studios based in Brisbane

      Well they are from Brisbane, so probably.

      AUSSIE PRIDE!!!!

    One of the 'word' endings?

    Word!

    You can walk in and around most of these. It’s a grimy labyrinth of urban design, and it’s an absolute joy to explore. You’ll feel like a kid playing with the most badass action figures you could ever have owned, set atop the biggest playset your imagination could handle.
    Despite the presence of very generous fast travel beacons, there’s just something satisfying about trudging through this city, hiding your agents amongst crowds of civilians and walking past enemy guards unnoticed. This isn’t a game that’s 100% action; shooting only starts when you draw weapons or enter a secure compound, and even then, you can make GTA-like getaways by running and hiding (complete with Satellite Reign’s own “wanted star” system).

    This was basically what made the original Syndicate so much damn fun, I am stoked that they have kept that aspect of it and made it more involving, without making it insanely complex.

    It's a great game... Though I do hope they tone down how incredibly overpowered simply stealthing everything is.

    A lone hacker with a silenced pistol can waltz through a military base with virtually no issues.

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