People Are Making Counter-Strike Knives In Real Life

The funny thing is, I'm not sure what would cost more: buying the materials to make a Karambit in real life, or buying the in-game skin from a third party website.

It's not a Karambit, mind you, although this one's a lot more fun to play with in real-life. It's a recreation of the Butterfly knife from Counter-Strike: Global Offensive. Butterfly skins don't usually fetch as much as an M9 Bayonet or a Karambit, but it looks a hell of a lot cooler thanks to the flipping animation.

Redditor Drkruler500, who kindly allowed me to to reproduce all the photos in the post, is a CSGO fan that decided to take on a challenge. How hard could it be for someone with the right skills to manufacture one of their favourite knives in real life?

They started with solid mild steel for the handles and 1/8" 1095 steel for the blade. 1095 is a high carbon steel that's often used for the production of knives. It's the same material that many older kitchen knives and pocket knives were crafted from, being strong and easy to sharpen.

The blade has been heat treated as well, with two temper cycles. "I didn't use aluminum because I don't really have the right tools," Drkruler500 added.

Owning a butterfly knife is illegal in Australia and New Zealand; you certainly can't carry one around with you. They're classed as a prohibited weapon down under, and to possess one you'll need to own a special license/permit.

But, damn do they look cool. And Drkruler500's production definitely passes the real test: how cool it looks when you flip it.

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Comments

    Owning a butterfly knife is illegal in Australia and New Zealand; you certainly can’t carry one around with you. They’re classed as a prohibited weapon down under, and to possess one you’ll need to own a special license/permit.

    In Victoria you can't even have a pen-knife keychain.

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