Off Topic: Aussie Slang

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So you might not have known, but today Australia's national dictionary has just been updated for the first time since 1988. It's basically a book about Australian mannerisms, the words and phrases we use that sound like utter garbage to other countries.

Question is -- what's your favourite Aussie slang?

Given the increased frequency of words like "flogged", "bugger" and other country-esque phrases over the last year, it's difficult to argue against the notion that I have something of a bogan streak in me. Just the other day a colleague was laughing at how I seem to call everyone "old mate", which is more or less code for "that person whose name I can't remember right now".

Even when I can actually remember their name, but it's a natural reflex and OK shut up I'm a bogan go away.

But we all have a little straya streak from time to time. And Australia has some fantastic phrases perfect for any situation.

What's yours?


Comments

    DILLIGAF, kaan kaant, and fuck me sideways would likely be my most common;y used ;)

      I appreciate kaan kaant just for the Frenzal Rhomb song of the same name, if nothing else hah

      I'd never come across DILLIGAF before (well, as an acronym anyway) and then just this afternoon I was driving behind a 4WD that had it on the rear windshield as a sticker.

      God damn universe.

        First time I heard it was in a Kevin Bloody Wilson song :)

    Huh, I feel like I haven't heard "flogged" in forever. And the "buggers" have been pretty few and far between too. And am actually struggling to think of any real Australianisms I commonly use at all. I mean there was that time back in year 8 or so when I couldn't stop using the word "stooge", thanks to watching too much Pizza and having it just latch onto my mind completely. That was weird.

    Woop Woop, because tons of remote places in Australia, always easier to bunch them up all as one. efficient ;)

    My bogan streak is more a rich ore seam running through my core. I'll constantly use colloquialisms, metaphors and similes that leave others tilting their head to the side.

    Flat out like a lizard drinking
    Off like a startled gazelle/fish milkshake/sock/startled gazelle
    Busier than a one armed brick layer in Baghdad (special occasions only)
    All over the place like a mad woman's breakfast/shit
    Snag short of a barbie
    Old mate
    Bugger me
    Snags
    Sangas
    Arvo
    Barbie

    Liberal use of the c word in the right context (have a good story around Americans misusing that) etc etc.

    Don't feel Bogan @alexwalker, you're in good company mate ;) Can't all be born with a silver spoon up our arse.

      Have an American who I work with, he was confused why we don't say Morno, as in a greeting in the Morning.
      So now morno is now a thing at my work.

    I'm very very happy that "doing a Bradbury" has made it into the Australian dictionary. It's probably my favourite moment in Olympic history ever.

      I am so glad someone mentioned this. Best Olympic moment ever!

    Colder than a witches tit
    Face like a bucket of smashed crabs
    Tighter than a fishes arsehole
    Knee high to a grasshopper

    On the topic of slang the word sprog in the uk means child while in Aus it is semen. An English family member found this out recently from the reaction of other adults when calling a bunch of kids "my little sprogs". She's a kindergarten teacher.

      haha never heard those before, (with the exception of the grasshopper) but slight variants of
      "Tight as a nuns cunt" and "Face like a half eaten meat pie"

      Last edited 23/08/16 11:44 am

        Cold as a nuns nasty is one I've heard, and describing someone as having a 'face like the north end of a south bound camel'.

      Nah, I've always heard 'sprog' or 'sproglets' used to refer to children, since the 80s at least.

      Yeah never heard Sprog used for kids.

      I think they call the baby in the original Mad Max sprog.... weird.

    Describing something as Grouse.

    I'm UK enough to remember a Grouse being an animal.

    I like that the nickname for a redhead is "blue" or "bluey".

      As a red head, I got called 'biscuits' in school more than bluey or blue.

        I got "Ginger Meggs" or just "Meggs" a fair amount from older people.

    I don't know if this is Strayan or English but I often say "cheers" instead of "thanks". Mostly when im buying something or getting served.

    I have so much of a bogan streak in me its more like a GT racing stripe on a XY Falcon !!!

    but im no match for my mate who I swear is a mind twin of the Honey Badger (if you don't know who he is look it up), he comes out with some crackers that's for sure.

    dryer than a nuns nasty,
    flat out like a lizard drinking,
    goin' off like a cut snake
    on it like a seagull on a chip
    gunna be like a midget at a urinal and stay on my toes.

    these are just some of his favourites.

    also how Aussie is the Honey Badger............legend that guy.

    Pickus uppa packa ciggies from the servo on the way home from the pokies willya, ya gunt.

      Mate I'll get Shazza and Dazza to do it when they bring the ute back from their Macca's. Hope they didn't get too pissed at the rissole, there was an Acca Dacca cover band tonight.

        Fuck ay, I reckon that'd be alright. Is Bruce gonna be there with 'is new Sheila, whatsername?

    I still use G'day. How we got this many comments through without it being said is unAustralian.
    UnAustralian is a term that can fuck right off, though.

    I've had several jobs where I'd have to make regular phone calls to people in North Queensland.

    My Strayan knob goes to eleven and while I tone it back down to about a six in daily life, it comes so naturally that I couldn't tell you lot the difference.

    Well I'm not here to fuck spiders.
    Farkoff.
    Getfarkedkarnt.

      Not here to fuck spiders is just the best. Absolute head tilter to people who've never heard it though!

        PG Version: not here to pet wombats.

    I love Aussie slang. Particularly when you can still surprise people.

    My best friend of twelve years doesn't get Australian sayings and I managed to floor them the other day, asking for a small amount.

    I said use a poofteenth. They had no idea what I was on about, just said to me. That after twelve years they are still surprised I can use slang they don't get

    Piff is the best.

    "Just fuckin' piff it"

    or

    "He piffed it at my fuckin' head!"

    The phrase that I was recently surprised by was the every day "Tuesday week".

    I don't know if it's entirely Australian, but it seems that most of the world has no idea what that means. I casually asked a non-Aussie colleague to deliver something to me by "Tuesday week" and he busted a gut to get it to me in 4 days, rather than the week-and-a-half that I was expecting.

    Last edited 23/08/16 1:43 pm

      "A week from Tuesday" is both too many bloody words and also too distinct. Tuesday week is open to interpretation, gives you a buffer.

    Aussie slang?? Yeah nah, s'alright aye.

    I especially like "from asshole to breakfast time" to mean all over the place, e.g. an infant eating could be said to have food from asshole to breakfast time.

    I also like saying "Face like a bag of assholes" and "Dry as a dead dingo's dick".

    A close family friend used to use heaps of Australianisms, it was the best. Some favourites:
    Off like a bride's nightie.
    Why buy a dog and bark yourself?
    Off like a bucket of prawns in the hot sun.

    Also my dad would often say when something fit well it was like 'a bum in a bucket' which I don't really hear anywhere.

    I find one of the funniest i hear is my roommates comparing the price of certain things to trips to bali in conversations, gets me every time

    Some of these are about as useless as an ashtray on a motorbike, or a one legged man at an arse kicking party.

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