Rewatch Google's Cloud Gaming Conference Here

The Google Nexus Player, Google's attempt in 2014 to enter the gaming market with their own hardware platform.

Can Google finally solve the thorny problem of laggy game streaming? That's what their upcoming cloud gaming announcement is all about, so let's tune in.

The livestream will officially begin at 0400 AEDT / 0300 AQST / 0330 ACST / 0600 NZDT / 0100 AWST on Wednesday, March 20. We don't know precisely how long the livestream will run for, but what we have heard is that the company will show off a controller of their own, as well as the streaming platform that will be playable on any console, PC, mobile, TVs and even Macbooks.

Here's What We're Hearing About Google's Plans For Gaming

Tomorrow, the tech giant Google will reveal its newest plans for entering the video game world. What we’re hearing suggests that the main focus isn’t on a console, as has been speculated, but instead a streaming platform with all sorts of bells and whistles. And a fancy new controller that you can use to play it.

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Google's gaming platform has been on the books for a while. There was the Google Nexus Player in 2014, and last year it was revealed that Google's Yeti project - which described a game streaming service like the one we'll hear about tomorrow - was originally scheduled to launch in 2017. The Information reported that various options had been trialled, including a separate gaming console to run the Yeti service, as well as an early variation that ran through Chromecast TV.

There's an interesting idea being floated about allowing spectators to watch streamers play their favourite game, and being able to drop into a match with them if the game (and streamer) supports it. Another alternative of being able to pick up from the save file that the streamer is playing on - again, if the game supports it - also sounds cool, and it also sounds like something that really only Google could pull off.

On the controller side, we know for sure that Google is planning on supporting pads other than their own. A commit was added to Chromium recently patching in support for the Switch Pro Controller, JoyCons (individually or as a pair), and the charging grip over USB:

But all of this is moot if there's too much latency to enjoy the game in the first place.

The whole livestream is being broadcast through YouTube, so you can watch that via the embed below. Again, it all kicks off from 0400 AEDT.

What are you hoping to see from tomorrow's announcement?


Comments

    Games will need to change to support our new laggier overlords.

    Case in point, using Nvidia's streaming from my PC to TV over a wired network and a 2080 Ti driving it (afaik, the absolute fastest way to stream), still has enough input lag that the mini games in Yakuza 0 are difficult to impossible to play sometimes.

    I feel games will need to increase their latency buffers for action in the design process so gamers don't feel hard done by.

      Yeah that's been my concern. That the tail wags the dog.
      But I have faith in gamers and economics - I don't think a shit experience will get off the ground no matter how much money gets thrown at it.
      How the hell would a 100 person multiplayer shooter work in a streaming context? Or something like Dirt Rally?

        The multiplayer shooter argument could work if the server was in the same location that was streaming the game data, with no real loss either way as long as users are still under 50ms or so, except for in regards to interp.

        Fast twitch games, like fighters for example, I can't see ever working well.

          Ah yeah. I don't really understand the technical aspects behind it, but I do know that I notice input lag when my TV isn't set to PC mode. So I can't imagine how streamed games would ever be tolerable.
          Presumably it's a bit like Remoteplay on PS4 when you're away from home. Which is horrifically shit.

      Which leads to a problem which has been around for ages. Being pissed when the guy you shoot in the back actually kills you because the lag compensation means he technically fired first.

      Aside from that I have concerns about the quality of the game. I mean we're getting ridiculous quality graphics and audio now if we have the cash. GTX20180 Ti (or it's successor) could give us 4k ray traced glory at high framerates, coupled with high quality 7.1 sound. How much computing power is a server going to need to provide that experience for multiple users before you even get to the data transfer and lag issues?

      I mean I could see it being a boon to cash poor gamers but if you're the type of person who owns a GTX2080 Ti I feel like you might be gimped by their cloud gaming solution.

    Is it just me or is the site even wider now to cram in more ads? Kotaku is a complete joke when it comes to reader-friendly webdesign.

      I thought I had accidentally changed my zoom!

      I love trying to chase peoples posts while my screen keeps scrolling up or trying to swipe down and a add pops up to take me to a new page I instantly have to exit. Well they gotta make money somehow... It's definitely not quality content that makes them the coin.

        This website is totally broken. One only needs to click the comments icon on any article on a phone browser to discover that. You will see the article load, then you will jump to the comments section... just in time to have SEVERAL pages of adverts appear that you have to scroll past to get back to the comments section.

        Grab Firefox 66. It has better management when it comes to content loading in while you're trying to read.

        The screen chase...omg yes....it's the single most aggravating thing

    It sounds like a wonderful innovation for the people of San Francisco and their Silicon Valley-Level of Internet Goodness.

    RIP for us here in Australia and ... well ... a not-insignificant part of the world.

    This will be yet another failed Google venture.

    Google being "bigger" than Sony / Nintendo doesn't mean anything. I mean, look at where Microsoft currently stands. Look at Spotify vs Apple and Amazon.

    No-one wants this product. Not yet.

      It may not be a fail. I could see it being successful in certain markets. Places like Korea with high population density and ubiquitous fast internet could probably benefit. Especially if they have local servers. Same with a bunch of places in Europe, Asia and the US. For we Aussies and a large chunk of the world I'm not sure it's going to be a success though.

    Companies can't even get game streaming from one room to the next in the same house to be free of input lag.

    Do not want.

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