Look At This Beautiful Game Of Pathfinder

Look At This Beautiful Game Of Pathfinder

A group of Australian friends just wound up an epic game of tabletop RPG Pathfinder, and I mean, I already said this in the headline, but just look at the thing.

Overseen by DM Paul Houlihan, who also did all the painting (the terrain is a mix of stuff, most of it from Dwarven Forge), the party (Persimmon’s Hate) can be seen here wrapping up a 15-hour session to conclude the second of six books in the Skull & Shackles campaign.

All photos below are by Mark Harrison. And if you’re reading this and thinking hey, my party has an equally amazing setup, let me know! I am very into this kind of shit.

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Comments

  • holey moley, that is beautiful, but must also be incredible expensive for that small area, and also completely impractical at the table. With how little some people would be able to see due to terrain blocking line of sight, you might as well be playing theatre of the mind.

    • This right here. Visuals are really nice and all, but some people definitely over do it and it can actually make playing the game a chore when it really shouldn’t be.

      For me personally this is definitely overdoing it. It looks great for sure, but there was clearly far more thought put towards being able to show it off in pictures than anything else.

      IF it was played in that state at least one person at that table was definitely having issues being able to see, having to stand constantly, etc.

      And having those sorts of issues during a supposedly 15 hour session? Fuck that noise.

  • Wow. He certainly hasn’t skimped.

    The Kraken miniature alone is USD100 or there abouts, and has limited re-usability. So to the pit fiend.

    Dwarven Forge is amazing but requires a second mortgage to get enough to be useful – looks like about USD800 worth on the table. Admittedly it’s pretty versatile and can be used again next time.

    Throw in the walls, scenery, props, other minis, boats, mats etc and you have thousands of dollars of assets. For a scene that will last, at best, an evening.

    Don’t get me wrong. I love it, but I’m not sure it’s worth it. A vinyl map and a sharpie costs about $30 and will last you adventure after adventure. It’s also a lot easier to see what’s happening, and less cramped.

    One of us is adulting wrong. I’m worried it might be me.

    Imagine if you’d spent the time setting that up and the party suddenly decides “Fuck it! We’re going to the desert.”

    • This is why it’s fun to follow 3D printing tabletop groups on social media – you get stuff that looks like this but with a lot of interesting breakdown and theory of modular set design, plus a lot of cool little bespoke setpieces and alternative minis. Cramping is a common issue so there are also now a lot of designs using half-height walls or slightly different scales of tile so that walls don’t eat into space needed for figure bases.

    • That’s about when the DM who planned all this gets your party tickets for the railroad…

      “Suddenly, your party comes across a magical lake in the middle of the desert with a castle at its centre.”

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