Overwatch League Players Fined $1,000 Each For Typing ‘Sex,’ ‘Big Dick’ Into Chat

Overwatch League Players Fined $1,000 Each For Typing ‘Sex,’ ‘Big Dick’ Into Chat
Photo: Robert Paul, Blizzard Entertainment

Friendly fifth-grade-level banter between foes is all well and good, but there’s a time and place for it. When you’re a professional Overwatch League player, the big stage—even during a quarantine—is not it.

While Overwatch League initially reacted to covid-19 by postponing all March and April matches, it’s now making up for lost time with online games each week. Over the weekend, two Overwatch League players, San Francisco Shock’s Dong-jun “Rascal” Kim and Los Angeles Valiant’s Jung-won “Lastro” Mun, got fined $US1,000 ($1,662) each for a mid-match exchange of words only tangentially related to Overwatch (unless you count Overwatch fan fiction, in which case they were extremely related).

In match chat, Mun began by saying “sex” and “big dick,” and Kim tossed in a “big dick” of his own. This prompted other members of both teams to react with surprise and laughter. Not long into this boldly-timed war of words, SF Shock tank player Matthew “Super” DeLisi asked them to cut it out because spectators “can see match chat.” In response, Mun said, “srysrysrysrysrysry,” a sentiment he later echoed in an apology on Twitter.

“I thought the viewers could not see the match chat because everyone was typing in it,” he wrote on Twitter. “I wrote it as a joke, although I should not have done it regardless of whether the viewers could see the match chat or not. I will make sure something like this never happens again. I apologise to all the fans and OWL viewers.”

Overwatch League’s official discipline tracker now contains two new entries, noting that both Mun and Kim have been fined $US1,000 ($1,662) for “inappropriate chat during a league match.”

Kotaku reached out to LA Valiant and SF Shock for more information, but as of this publishing, the teams had yet to reply.

It seems, then, that if players wish to convey these ideas during official matches, they’ll have to resort to the more abstract form of expression that is the “tactical crouch.”

Comments

  • If your going to put yourself up on the world stage podium, expect to be judged critically all the time, so it pays to not be a big dick about it!

  • I’ll be honest in saying it was pretty funny seeing this stuff up. They’re team mates who knew tried to spam the chat so it wouldn’t be seen which made it even funnier. That being said, these guys are pro athletes and the fines should stick.

    Also how isnt Kotaku reporting about Boston Uprising sacking Mouffins due to him soliciting underage girls, just like their former player Dreamkazper did?

  • how do these fines actually work? are they a legal thing as part of the contract that they can force you to pay them under threat of lawsuit? are they more pay the fine or face suspension from the league? how does this actually work?

    I’d say the fine amount is also a little heavy handed based on what’s said here. neither were offensive. crude and unecessary but, worse is said here. is the problem how tangential it was from overwatch itself? are they not allowed to discuss non overwatch stuff? or is it a mix of both being the cause?

    • I think its always got to do with keeping sponsors happy. It’s like when people swear in youtube videos and they get demonitized, or like how Disney has little to no swearing in their movies, even those with violence like Star Wars.

      As for your first point, you can check out section 6.1.b of the player code of conduct here: https://overwatchleague.com/en-us/news/21568602/rules-of-competition-and-code-of-conduct
      My assumption is breaking the code of conduct means the league can fine the players as reparations

    • Presumably it is linked to the player’s contract with the team, and the team’s contract with Blizzard. Depending on how the contract is worded, it might be handled as a deductions from future pay.

      As for the amount, I suspect anything that could affect the rating/classification of broadcasts is considered a big deal for commercial reasons and treated accordingly.

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