Ex-Ubisoft Devs Open New Studio, Immediately Diss Ubisoft

Ex-Ubisoft Devs Open New Studio, Immediately Diss Ubisoft
Screenshot: Ubisoft

Nesting Games, a newly formed development studio based in Québec, Canada, today announced its co-ownership by Italian publisher Digital Bros. Nesting, officially established in August by former Ubisoft employees, wasted no time in distancing itself from the open world style that has become so associated with the French company’s release slate.

“We want to go back to creating RPGs that are focused on immersion, great characters, powerful storytelling, and strong gameplay,” said Nesting CCO Jordane Thiboust via press release. “We are moving away from the ‘massive open world’ model, full of icons to clean up, and returning to experiences that are content-driven and ultimately respect the player’s time. Whether you play our games for 30 minutes or a two-hour session, what you will get is always interesting content and a gratifying experience.”

According to the Nesting Games website, Thiboust previously contributed to Assassin’s Creed Syndicate and Assassin’s Creed Odyssey. He was a lead game designer on both projects.

Nesting is also comprised of ex-Ubisoft employees like director Sebastien Brassard, who worked on the Prince of Persia and Splinter Cell series, and narrative director James Mittag, a scriptwriter on Assassin’s Creed Valhalla and Immortals Fenyx Rising.

“We are blessed to have Digital Bros as co-owner of the studio, as it allows us to fast-track our studio life cycle,” Brassard said. “We’ve felt from day one that we were part of the family of Digital Bros. On top of this, our open and collaborative recruitment has helped us build a full roster of incredible talent to build our game. This process will help us deliver the strong values upon which our studios are founded.”

These values, Nesting Games stated previously, include nice-sounding goals like imparting workers with a strong sense of inclusivity and collaboration as well as offering full and partial remote work, in-office daycare services, and permanent summer Fridays.

Nesting Games’ first AAA project is described as a narrative-focused, single-player RPG based on a brand-new property. And while those adjectives certainly provide a lot of wiggle room, at least we know the game won’t involve climbing towers to survey a massive map.

Comments

  • People love to piss on Ubi’s open world games design.

    And they always do it while completely fucking ignoring that there are clearly MANY customers/players out there that actually quite like that sort of game… Otherwise Ubi and others wouldn’t still be doing it.

    If you don’t like it, fine… But don’t go around yelling about how it must be bad just because you personally don’t find it entertaining, engaging, or whatever other nonsense that usually gets thrown against open world games.

    • Yup. Personally I love climbing a tower to survey a map. I love the huge, gorgeous vistas, and knowing that anywhere I can see I can go. Then I can open the map to get my to do list.

      While I enjoy smaller, sound stage RPGs, I cannot get enough of getting lost in huge open world games. When RDRII first came out on PC I spent days on end just riding around watching the world. AC: Valhalla is equally immersive and gorgeous, though with a far less diverse biome.

      I don’t diss Ubi for their open world games. I love them for them.

    • I think people are playing them wrong (the good ones, let’s not talk about Breakpoint). There is absolutely no need to actually do everything that’s there, just stick to the main story, naturally get sidetracked sometimes and wander off, do some side missions or other things which look interesting. That’s what I do and it’s great, at it’s core it’s no different to a structured singleplayer RPG, it just gives the option for more. Key word being ‘option’.

    • Ubisoft games sell well because they give a large amount of non-linear options in how you tackle the objectives and different things dotted around the map. That’s why the world is “open”, so we’re not stuck running down disguised corridors for the entirety of the game. For all of the people shitting on the Ubisoft style games, I’ve had far more fun playing Immortals than I ever did playing FFXIII or other corridor simulators.

  • Considering the incredible amount of detail, vision, and work which goes into many of their games, particularly AC, I’m just excited to see how that translates to a more focused experience from a much smaller and focused team without a thousand moving parts and influences of a massive multi-studio effort. Paring it back to the core.

  • “We are moving away from the ‘massive open world’ model, full of icons to clean up, and returning to experiences that are content-driven and ultimately respect the player’s time. Whether you play our games for 30 minutes or a two-hour session, what you will get is always interesting content and a gratifying experience.”

    So now wait 4-7 years to see if it’s total PR bullshit.

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