Report: Nearly Half Of Paradox Staff Experience “Mistreatment”

Report: Nearly Half Of Paradox Staff Experience “Mistreatment”
Image: Paradox / Kotaku

Swedish tech news site Breakit is reporting some grim news from within Swedish publisher Paradox. A leaked document, created by unions Unionen and Sveriges, suggests a discriminatory workplace at Paradox, where almost half of employees report they’ve experienced “abusive/incorrect treatment.”

The survey, conducted by the Swedish unions, spoke to 133 of the 400-ish employees at the company, and alleges 44 per cent said they’d experienced some form of “mistreatment”. Of those surveyed, 26 per cent were women, where the statistics are much worse: there 69 per cent said they had “experienced abusive treatment,” according to the report.

Breakit goes on to say — translated by Google Translate — the leaked survey results claim a “culture of silence” at the company, with “almost no one who has experienced abusive treatment” feeling that the issues were satisfactorily resolved.

This all comes just days after the surprise resignation of Paradox’s CEO, Ebba Ljungerud, although new (and old) CEO Fredrik Wester denied that there was any connection between the results of the survey and her decision to go. She did, however, see the report before she left, according to Breakit, and according to Paradox’s very brief statement on her leaving, was going due to “differing views on the company’s strategy going forward.”

Breakit goes on to report Paradox is responding to the news by conduction its own internal survey. The site says a company-wide email told staff that the company is, “now in the process of bringing in an external, neutral company to conduct a thorough review of our process and a comprehensive employee survey.” Paradox’s communications manager, Loïc Fontaine, told staff they would combine the results of this with the unions’ survey, and that they are, “prepared to take action.”

We’ve reached out to Paradox to find out how they intend to respond to this survey, beyond just carrying out another one of their own. We’ll update should they get back to us.

Comments

  • “The site says a company-wide email told staff that the company is, “now in the process of bringing in an external, neutral company to conduct a thorough review of our process and a comprehensive employee survey.””

    This appears to be code for: hiring a consultancy group good at ensuring that the company has the ‘on paper’ policies in place to ensure they meet the bare minimum standard of ‘compliance’ to avoid legal responsibility for any claims against them, without necessarily doing anything meaningful to change their culture of bullying and intimidation.

    By doing their own ‘comprehensive employee survey’ they can safely arrange the questions in such a way that will all but guarantee a positive result no matter how employees may attempt to answer, demonstrating evidence of improvement without any actual improvement. I’ve seen that particular technique before, first-hand, multiple times. The best way corporate can think of to reduce negative feedback is to reduce the possible avenues to provide negative feedback.

    I really wish there was some kind of all-powerful arbiter for fairness who could look over all this corporate bullshit and bap those involved on the nose with a rolled-up newspaper and force them to fucking behave like decent human beings.

    • Powerful arbiter for the whole industry isn’t possible, that comes down to a countries laws. Even then silence and fear of losing the dream job is overwhelming crippling to people in the industry.

      Like France has some really tough employment laws and unionisation, and Ubisoft was still a ugly pile of abuse.

      At the end of the day it comes back to what you can uncover, report and sue.

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