Nintendo Thanks Feds For Sending Hacker To Prison For 3 Years

Nintendo Thanks Feds For Sending Hacker To Prison For 3 Years
Image: Nintendo / Mario Wiki / Wikimedia Commons / Kotaku

Recently indicted Nintendo hacker Gary Bowser has been handed a 40-month prison sentence by the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Washington for creating and selling “console-hacking software and devices used to play pirated Nintendo Switch games.” This is according to a victory lap-style press release published by Nintendo this afternoon that dedicates much of its word count to praising American law enforcement.

We’ve included the full text below so you can see what a sizable chunk of gratitude it is. The way Nintendo thanks these feds, you’d assume they brought in the next Pablo Escobar instead of some guy who helped folks pirate video games.

Nintendo appreciates the hard work and tireless efforts of federal prosecutors and law enforcement agencies to curb illegal activities on a global scale that cause serious harm to Nintendo and the video game industry. In particular, Nintendo would like to thank the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) of the Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Washington, the U.S. Department of Justice’s Computer Crime & Intellectual Property Section and the Justice Department’s Office of International Affairs for their significant contribution and assistance.

The U.S. government’s prosecution argued in court documents filed last week that Bowser was the “public face” of a “criminal enterprise” known as Team Xecuter, estimating that the group’s actions resulted in $US65 ($90) million in losses for Nintendo (these statistics are usually questionable) and suggesting five years in prison as punishment.

Read More: Gary Bowser Pleads Guilty To Piracy Charges After Nintendo Pursuit

Bowser’s defence, on the other hand, claimed he was the “least culpable” of the three arrested members of Team Xecuter and was only being used to “send a message” because his co-defendants reside in countries that may not extradite them.

Bowser also agreed to pay Nintendo a sum of $US10 ($14) million during a separate, civil case that was settled in December 2021.

I don’t know what to say here. I know we’ve made light of this whole thing because of the dude’s name, but it sure seems excessive that he’s losing three years of his life due to selling video game modchips.

 

Comments

  • “it sure seems excessive that he’s losing three years of his life due to selling video game modchips.”

    The fact that he settled a civil suit for US10m suggests that he made a massive amount from his crime – 3 years is pretty good. I know someone who got 5 years for a white-collar fraud of <$200k (different jurisdiction obviously).

    • According to reports he made about 300k, the settlement of 10 million was a fantasy figure both he and Nintendo knew he couldn’t afford.

      Nintendo’s prize was the admission of guilt. Which they used to say, he can’t pay, jail him instead.

  • “..but it sure seems excessive that he’s losing three years of his life due to selling video game modchips.”

    Great way to misrepresent the entire case Ian, as well has Team Xecuter’s deliberate bricking of consoles and the fact that being able to pirate video games was one of the main aspects they advertised, alongside hosting pirated copies of video games.

    “Image: Nintendo / Mario Wiki / Wikimedia Commons….”

    Are you cooked? Neither the Mario Wiki nor Wikimedia Foundation own that render, nor does the latter own the FBI seal.

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