Tagged With cpus

Shared from Gizmodo

3

There are few gambles in the tech world as big as spending billions to build a new computer processor from scratch. Former AMD board member Robert Palmer supposedly compared it to Russian roulette: "You put a gun to your head, pull the trigger, and find out four years later if you blew your brains out."

Six years ago AMD loaded the gun and pulled the trigger, dramatically restructuring itself internally in a mad bid to escape a disaster of its own making. Now we've seen the results and, instead of dying, AMD has a savvy new CPU microarchitecture, Zen, that's the foundation of the shockingly good new series of Ryzen processors. They're so good, in fact, that they could pose a real challenge to Intel's incumbent dominance and change what the computer market looks for the next few years.

Shared from Gizmodo

2

It looks as though Intel has some issues with its next generation of CPUs. Yesterday during an earnings call, Intel CEO Brian Krzanich admitted that Intel would be delaying the highly anticipated Cannon Lake processor until 2019. The delay means Intel's CPUs won't see a very large jump in speed or power efficiency any time soon.

Instead, we'll be getting the just-announced Whiskey Lake, a new CPU architecture, as well as a body of booze I'm sure more than one CPU designer at Intel would like to leap into.

Shared from Gizmodo

0

After Intel's very bad last few months and AMD's very good last few months, it seemed awfully confusing that the two rival CPU makers would team up for a new chip.

Sure it was all good for AMD - who is riding high on the success of its new Ryzen CPUs and Vega GPUs - but Intel has spent the last few months in the hot seat courtesy of the Meltdown and Spectre security fiasco. Every CPU the company makes, including the one reviewed here, is vulnerable without patch. Fortunately, the new Intel 8th-gen CPU with integrated AMD Vega graphics is so fast you can almost forgive the fact it had to be patched to be secure.

Shared from Gizmodo

0

It's been nearly a month since The Register first revealed that every single major processor in devices is subject to a series of harrowing security vulnerabilities known as Spectre and Meltdown. And in light of news that Intel informed foreign interests of the vulnerabilities before the US government, and that Microsoft is pulling its latest patch from Intel due to some heinous bugs, we thought we'd revisit the saga and what you can (and cannot) do to protect your data.

Shared from Gizmodo

17

When AMD came out guns blazing with its multi-core, heavily multi-threaded Ryzen CPUs, we knew that Intel wouldn't take long to respond. And it has, with a new line-up of Core i5, i7 and a new i9 with as many as 18 cores and 36 hyperthreading threads. They'll be phenomenally fast, of course, but will have a price tag that puts any other PC component you could think of to shame.

12

NVIDIA has pushed out the GTX 1080 Ti and lately we've seen the launch of the RX 500 series cards.

But it's really AMD's Vega GPUs that people have been holding out for. Earlier this morning the company confirmed it would start shipping the first Vega GPUs - although not the consumer cards people are expecting - from the end of next month - and as an added bonus, there's a new 16 core CPU to boot.