Tagged With games as service

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For Honor’s Marching Fire update went live this week. While some of the changes it brings can be quite granular, when taken as whole it offers a substantial refresh of Ubisoft’s 20-month-old medieval brawler. For those willing to pay, there are four new fighters. For everyone else, there’s an overhaul of the game’s graphics, as well as the introduction of its best competitive mode yet.

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Fatmooch69 has spent the last couple of weeks searching for a bot in For Honor. The AI in question is a Raider, one of the game’s two-handed axe wielding vikings, called TheeLizardWizard. Fotmooch69 has enlisted other Reddit users to help him, asking them to share screenshots if they ever encounter it. That’s because TheeLizardWizard is a tribute to a close friend of his called “B”, who he says died last autumn.

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You've probably heard about how a comet hit the Fortnite map by now. There's a reason so many people were transfixed by this cosmic encounter: Developer Epic made it feel like an event, worthy of wonder in the same way a real-world solar eclipse would be. In an age of instant social media updates, constant leaks and revelatory datamines, managing to delight players in unexpected ways is laudable.

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There was once a time when video game developers would make a game, release it, and then move onto the next big thing. That time has long since passed. These days, you're more likely to see a new Metroid than you are to buy an AAA game that's never updated, patched or enhanced in some way. Today's big video games aren't products -- they're services.