Tagged With games as service

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Fatmooch69 has spent the last couple of weeks searching for a bot in For Honor. The AI in question is a Raider, one of the game’s two-handed axe wielding vikings, called TheeLizardWizard. Fotmooch69 has enlisted other Reddit users to help him, asking them to share screenshots if they ever encounter it. That’s because TheeLizardWizard is a tribute to a close friend of his called “B”, who he says died last autumn.

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You've probably heard about how a comet hit the Fortnite map by now. There's a reason so many people were transfixed by this cosmic encounter: Developer Epic made it feel like an event, worthy of wonder in the same way a real-world solar eclipse would be. In an age of instant social media updates, constant leaks and revelatory datamines, managing to delight players in unexpected ways is laudable.

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There was once a time when video game developers would make a game, release it, and then move onto the next big thing. That time has long since passed. These days, you're more likely to see a new Metroid than you are to buy an AAA game that's never updated, patched or enhanced in some way. Today's big video games aren't products -- they're services.