Tagged With pax east 2014

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Video game movement is the best, isn't it? Jumping higher than possible in reality, dodging, rolling and sprinting with impossible smoothness across precise vectors... it's no wonder you get limitations like a double jump or short dash distances. Fenix Rage takes those strictures away, giving you infinite dash and infinite jumping. It's the kind of game where you need it.

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Life is stressful, and sometimes even the bravest people shut down under too much trauma. Darkest Dungeon takes that emotional reality and weaves it into the game, giving players a band of warriors who can get so sick and tired of fighting all the damn time that they will just quit or run away.

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Some games ask you to shoot, jump or strategise in ways that are similar to what you've done. Sure, there may be unique tweaks designed to pique your interest, but you mostly go in knowing what to expect. Other games are different deep down in their DNA, challenging the way you do even the simplest things. Miegakure's got four dimensions instead of three so, yeah, it's one of the deep-down-different ones.

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Five years ago, Spider: The Secret of Bryce Manor became an instant classic in the iPhone games library. The moody, wordless experience turned players into multi-legged predators wending their way into creepy environments and a foreboding meta-story. That game's sequel won't just be debuting on iOS; it will be on Android, PC, Mac and Linux. It might even show up on consoles. And when Spider: Rite of the Shrouded Moon comes out, it will be pulling in the real world with it.

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Did you know Gearbox Software founder, president and CEO Randy Pitchford started out as a professional magician in Hollywood? He unleashed his magical powers at the Gearbox panel at PAX East earlier today, and the world trembled beneath his might.

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Usually, games that happen beyond Earth's atmosphere take you to planets teeming with life. Meeting creatures with tentacles where hair or hands should be or with strangely angled mandibles isn't uncommon in sci-fi games. But, none of that happens in Elegy for Dead World, which we got a chance to see at PAX East this year. Everything that ever lived on these planets is long-deceased and you have to tell the cosmos what you think happened to them. And you have to use poetry to do it.