Tagged With tvs

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HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface) is a set of hardware and software standards designed to support the transmission of audio and video. Unlike older standards, which required separate cables for audio and video, HDMI can handle both though a single connection.

It's now the de facto standard for connecting external devices to TVs, linking external displays to computers (although that often requires an adaptor) and even adding smart TV functions to regular TVs through devices like the Google Chromecast, Apple TV and Amazon Fire TV Stick. Let's take a walk down HDMI Lane to see what makes it tick and how to make informed buying decisions.

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The OLED TVs on display in JB Hi-Fi and other electronic stores are usually turned to maximum brightness. While this is great for grabbing your attention, it's not an accurate representation of picture quality in the real world.

So what can you do about it? Here are some tricks of the trade for picking an OLED TV that will actually look great in your lounge room.

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There's been a rush of new TVs announced over the last few weeks. And while new hardware is great, it's especially handy because it means the prices on last year's models get a healthy discount.

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Whenever I think 'OLED', I think $$$$$. Whenever I think Hisense, I think 'cost-effective'. So what might happen if those two things were to collide? We're about to find out, as Hisense Australia has announced a brand spanking new OLED TV for the AU Market, to land alongside its already available ULED 4K TV models.

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TCL's latest mid-range C2 LED television gives you just about everything you could want from a TV at a surprisingly reasonable price, in five different screen sizes.

You get Android TV, with built-in Netflix and Stan apps and Chromecast, HDR video support and an integrated soundbar. So why wouldn't you buy it?

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Samsung's The Frame is a TV that's just as much a piece of art as it is a television. Switch it on and it's a 4K Ultra HD; switch it off and it'll display any of hundreds of pieces of art. And Samsung's just announced a smaller 43-inch version, that interests me a lot more than the existing 55-inch and 65-inch versions.

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They say size matters - and when it comes to TVs, that adage definitely holds true. If 65 inches just isn't cutting it anymore, Kogan has an offer that's well worth checking out.

For a limited time, you can get its gargantuan 75-inch 4K LED TV for just $1999. That's like, 25 bucks an inch! Here are the details.

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It's that time of year when manufacturers are cycling out old TVs for their latest ones. And that means you can get some pretty solid deals on end-of-life models, like this 65" 4K Sony TV with HDR support.

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Earlier today I asked people: have you upgraded to 4K yet? The most common reason against upgrading was down to the cost, which I can completely understand.

However, if you are looking to upgrade your TV and cost is a concern, Kogan has a TV that's ... well, it's really bloody cheap.

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There are a lot of reasons to game on a PC instead of a console. The ability to upgrade your game machine on your own time and in accordance with your own budget is a big advantage. The improved performance -- due to the sheer power of new PC hardware -- is another. According to Gamasutra, Kevin Gammill, Group Program Manager for Xbox, seems to think another, very cool feature of PC gaming is about to come to television gaming: Variable refresh rate.

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LG (currently) has the monopoly on OLED screens, and for good reason - the technology is notoriously expensive and difficult to engineer. But the results? Genuinely the closest you will get to a high-quality cinema experience in the home.

But after spending the night with LG's latest OLED range, I'd say it's even better.