The Insides Of Video Game Hardware Make For Pretty Good Artwork

The Insides Of Video Game Hardware Make For Pretty Good Artwork

Consumer tech products are often imbued with a pristine, ornamental quality in our current design-crazed age. In spite of that, most gadgets aren't exactly things that you could imagine hanging up on your wall to impress new guests.

BRS Innovations, a small startup from Ottawa, Canada, wants to change that. It recently launched a Kickstarter campaign for a project called "X-Ray Artwork" that proposes to turn X-Ray images of various gadgets and other household objects into fine art prints.

People have used X-Ray machines to turn video game consoles and their assorted peripherals into artwork before. But this looks like one of the first projects that's trying to take this sort of work off the internet and into meatspace.

Also, I love the way that these images capture some of the frenetic quality of gameplay itself -- something I haven't seen before. The power cord that extends out from something like the NES Light Gun or GameCube controller (below) feel like forensic evidence documenting the history of how these pieces of metal and plastic have been pushed and prodded by their players.

They're static objects, sure. But they take on a life of their own when put into the right hands.

Check out the Kickstarter here.

The Insides Of Video Game Hardware Make For Pretty Good Artwork
The Insides Of Video Game Hardware Make For Pretty Good Artwork

via Eurogamer


Comments

    So a company that works with the military wants you to drop $4000 on their kickstarter for an xray image? The world just seems to get more greedy everyday.

      Dragar,

      We use the same gear that many of the military and Police teams do. We are doing this because we love it! Our passion for games is just like yours, but we dont have all the systems we want to image.

      The Kickstarter, while mostly covering the cost of printing and sending the rewards, will allow us to get our hands on some more rare equipment and keep imaging. Things like the PowerGlove, Jaguar and other less common systems.

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