It Took A Month For Logan Paul To Become The Real Victim

Logan Paul, the wayward YouTuber explained again in a television how he messed up and he's really, really sorry for posting a video in which he gawks and laughs at an apparent dead body in Aokigahara, known as the suicide forest. He's learned tough lessons and maybe it was all supposed to happen this way because now he can use his fame to help others.

The infamous video, which was viewed 6.3 million times in 24 hours, was made during Paul's trip to Japan. He removed the video after an enormous backlash, but the other culturally offensive videos he made in the country are still up.

In the month since, Paul has apologised about the suicide video on Twitter, apologised in a YouTube video, and released a public service video about what to do if you're suicidal and how to help people who are struggling with suicidal thoughts. The video includes useful information from suicide prevention advocates like John Draper, director of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

With more than 24 million views, it might be one of the most watched videos on the topic of suicide prevention. But it puts Paul front and center, a window into his journey from manboy vlogger to humbled, enlightened empath. His hair is tamed and he's left the Toy Story alien hat at home. Instead of holding a camera in front of his face or gesticulating wildly, his fingers are clasped together as he listens astutely.

The weekend marked the next step in his brand salvation tour - the coveted Good Morning America interview.

Paul wants the world to know how difficult the last month has been for him. "It's been tough because, ironically, I'm being told to commit suicide myself," he told Michael Strahan.

"Millions of people literally telling me they hate me to go die in a fire like the most horrible horrific things."

But it wasn't all for naught, according to Paul. In fact, maybe the person in his video was meant to die so that Paul could start this journey of awareness. "[The body] was a hundred yards away from the parking lot. It doesn't make any sense and I believe it happened for a reason," Paul said.

"And I think that reason is so I could take this experience and learn from it, spread the message the right way about suicide prevention and suicide prevention awareness."

When Strahan brought up YouTube's removal of Paul's channel from the Google Preferred premium advertising program, Paul closed his eyes and pursed his lips, appearing visibly disappointed for the first time in the interview. "I understand that they needed to take a stance," he said. "And while I don't necessarily maybe agree with it, I do respect it...It hurts, but it's not like I'm drowning."

YouTube's actions surely put a temporary dent in Paul's income. But now he's more famous than ever. He was already one of the most popular celebrities to children under the age of 13. Now he's a household name - GMA status. And he's going to be just fine. He built a meager bit of Vine fame into a YouTube empire.

His brother, Jake Paul, runs Team 10, essentially a label for some of the most influential YouTubers, including Logan Paul, that helps the stars remain famous on a medium that isn't built for permanence. But Logan Paul doesn't even need the help at this point. Now it's not just kids who are waiting to see whatever he does next - it's parents and people who no longer want to be parents because of idiots like Logan Paul.

Paul, of course, isn't the victim. The victims are the family of the person in Aokigahara forest who has now turned into a grotesque meme and a catalyst for a vlogger's polished and produced path to enlightenment. The victims are anyone who might have considered suicide after watching Paul's video. And the victims are small YouTube creators.

After the Paul backlash, Google made major changes to video monetisation that make it harder for small channels to make money. Under the new strategy, which will go into effect February 20, channels with less than 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 hours of viewed videos over the last year won't receive ad revenue, making it easier for YouTube to vet more popular videos and determine which are safe for ads.

YouTube had been facing strong criticism for months over its hosting and monetisation of supremacist videos and creepy kid content.

But the timing of the new monetisation rules made it seem as if Paul's suicide forest video was the final straw, as if YouTube wanted to let its advertisers know that they don't need to worry about their ads running on videos of corpses and opportunistic jackasses.

If you struggle with suicidal thoughts, please call Lifeline on 13 11 14.

WATCH MORE: Gaming News


Comments

    what the fuck is with the fucking title, no he is not the real victim and he will never be

      It's a pretty clear shot at him and his self-entitled bullshit.

      What a self obssessed narcissist.... the reason the suicide was right there for him to film was to teach him a lesson. WTF!!! His PR manager must be working overtime to get him to pull offthat scripted BS.

      If he learnt anything he should of taken a lot of oorevious videos down and cleaned up his act especially with his neighbours and outstanding police complaints... or apologising to all of Japan for being a douche while in there country.

      There will be a youtuber community backlash if they let this guy back into any of the premium programs.

    It's sarcasm.

      Sarcasm really doesn't work in text format.

        It doesn't need to. They spell it out at the end of the article.

        Paul, of course, isn't the victim. The victims are the family of the person in Aokigahara forest who has now turned into a grotesque meme and a catalyst for a vlogger's polished and produced path to enlightenment. The victims are anyone who might have considered suicide after watching Paul's video. And the victims are small YouTube creators.

        All people need to do is, y'know... read.

          I feel like the headline could have done with quote marks - "the real victim".

    Why give this piece of shit the time of day? Media outlets should blacklist him so he is forced to get a real job.

      yeah I'm over hearing about him. Let him fade back into obscurity.

      With respect, you clicked on the article. More ad $$ for these outlets. Can't stand the bloke either and rather never read another thing, however there's just too much opportunity.

        I usually wouldn't click either but you don't make the best decisions coming off night shift :(

      I've got to agree with @longwittyusername here. We are a part of the problem.

      In this instance I don't mind, it does actually point out just how pathetic he is without resorting to the sorts of embarrassing hyperbole that many other outlets reserve for him and his ilk.

      I have to question what exactly you think constitutes a real job though - he's scum, his content is garbage, and he manipulates children to his financial gain in a way that shouldn't be allowed, true - but, given his work is as successful as it is what exactly about it isn't a 'real' job? I think a lot reality TV is awfully similar to the Paul's content in terms of their shameless manipulation, but does merely being better at hiding their ethical issues or a bigger budget or a different platform make their work any more 'real'? Hell, most journalism now is so click focused that the content doesn't even matter. I hate click-bait-y, useless articles that clog most online news pages, but people are clicking on them - and surely that's what a job is - seeing demand and making money by filling that demand.

        What Logan Paul has is a business. He doesn't have a 'job'.

        I think a 'real' job is generally one where the actions of an individual make a meaningful, positive contribution to society. Whether it's sweeping the streets or managing an ASX-listed company or running a small general store.

        Take for example Dunkey. He basically shitposts, however there is absolutely care and thought out into his content. He's master at entertaining his audience and what he does would no doubt take a lot of effort and makes for genuine non-destructive entertainment. All whilst 'just making videos'. Entertainment can certainly be a job if done well.

        Logan Paul buys food and leaves it on the back of taxis in Japan. Films it. Posts it. I think it's fair to say that's not a job, regardless of whether it makes him money or not.

          I wouldn't have thought of this distinction, but I can't say I disagree.

          I quite like your distinction here between 'job' and 'business', but I'm not sure the line is quite so well defined. If entertainment (I obviously don't think the Paul's content is entertaining) is only judged to be worthwhile if 'done well' surely the line is awfully nebulous between what's a valuable contribution and what's not.

          Take Kotaku's own regular series 'fine art'. It takes very little effort to produce at this point, dump a bunch of an artist's work into an article (often submitted by the artist for their own exposure), link to their page, make an appealing title, hit publish. Zero effort, hardly a significant addition to society at large but I personally take value from those articles despite that. If value isn't determined by effort and the value I take from it is purely personal then drawing a distinction between what does or doesn't amount to contributing to society is pretty abstract.

          Finally I think you'd have to look at jobs and businesses in a very strange light if morality made one job 'real' and another simply a business. If you're a cinematographer hired by a YouTube personality/channel or for a major film much of the work you're doing is the same. You're still pointing a camera at what the director / YouTuber etc. wants you too. The end product is different of course, but the legitimacy of their work is surely on par, even if the required skills, the eventual recognition and the pay are not. Who constitutes the society we are supposed to contribute too? The audience for entertainers? The shareholders of a major company? Website regulars like you and me? I think the only answer must be all the above, but no occupation could ever benefit every member of society, so at the least I think it needs to be considered a scale from 'real' to business, not a hard line distinction given everyone would draw that distinction differently.

    And the ridiculous wheel keeps turning.

    Do something stupid and play the victim, is the Team 10 motto

    YouTubers are mostly self absorbed dicks anyhow but totally glad this shit gets filtered into kotaku...........

      YouTube 'personalities', yes. I do, however, think it's unfair to deny that some YouTube professionals make great content wholly deserving
      financial success.

    'But it wasn't all for naught, according to Paul. In fact, maybe the person in his video was meant to die so that Paul could start this journey of awareness. "[The body] was a hundred yards away from the parking lot. It doesn't make any sense and I believe it happened for a reason," Paul said.'

    Holy hell, there are not enough adjectives in the English language for this piece of shit!

    Yeah, I'm sure the deceased ended their life so this psychopath could learn to become a decent human being! /s

    "In fact, maybe the person in his video was meant to die so that Paul could start this journey of awareness."

    What the fuck. Straight up, what the fuck.
    Whoever wrote this should be fired and never allowed to professionally write ever again.

    the wayward YouTuber explained again in a television how he messed up
    He was in a television. Zoolander.. is that you?

    The internet and the current generation of kids would have been better off without him.

    He was already one of the most popular celebrities to children under the age of 13.There is no future if kids see this dick as any kind of role model.

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