Tagged With otome

2

Otome games such as Mystic Messenger and Tokimeki Memorial Girl's Side are made specifically for women. The genre began with with Koei's 1994 game Angelique. Nowadays, otome games are mostly visual novels with a lot of reading, but the genre started with a dialogue-light management sim. When I sat down with Tim Rogers to play it for the first time, I saw a lot of the building blocks for later otome games, and a few ideas I wish would come back.

0

Absolute Obedience - Zettai Fukuju Meirei (2007) was one of the first commercial Japanese "boys' love" visual novels officially localised in English, making it a something of a relic nowadays. After it was released, there wouldn't be another licensed game from this niche genre brought over to the West for almost a decade, and some of its divisive themes and presentation give us a clue why.

0

Dating sim Mystic Messenger is blowing up, simulating the too-real experience of falling in love with mysterious people online. It's a relatable otome ("maiden") game in which, brilliantly, anime boys -- and one girl -- interact with you over a fake chatroom and text messages.

Your character stumbles upon the fictional Mystic Messenger app under strange circumstances, and, over the course of 11 days, gets to know potential paramours online and offline. Mystic Messenger is brilliant, and there's a lot to unpack about how its fake interface best shows each character's flaws and charms.

0

The Korean dating simulator Mystic Messenger has become somewhat of a sensation among over a million women worldwide. It's an "otome" game (literally, "maiden game") that offers female players a harem of anime boys to court. These suitors are all charming in their own ways and all have their particular emotional needs. And, goddamn, are they needy.