The Water-Repelling Spray That’s A Mix Of Science And Outright Sorcery

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What. The. Hell.

I’ve seen a video demonstration of NeverWet before, but never a demonstration as all-inclusive as this one, posted about a week ago. The product, which is arriving (or has already arrived) in Home Depot and Red Rose Commons, will turn anything it touches into an magical water-repellant material. More info here.

Watch the video. You may find yourself asking the same sorts of questions we were asking today in Kotaku chat. What if you sprayed yourself? How would you get it off? Would it make you sink immediately to the bottom of the ocean? Can we make it work with bullets? What about for birth control? (I know, ew. But also… right?)

Is this all some sort of elaborate hoax? How far are we, realistically, from force-field technology?

And on, and on.

Anyway. Everyone doing well? Have a good weekend? Play any good games lately? Talk games, weekend activities, and magically subverting the rules of science, here or at TAY.

Comments

  • I want to know does it repel smells? What if you spray your dancing pants and they stay clean but you can’t wash the smell sweaty ball sack off them?

  • impressive, but the iphone has to be wiped off? i would have thought no liquid would stick to it, as like the no drip toilet brush?

  • Ok so here is a few facts.

    It washes off with soap, and other chemicals like oils (eg natural skin oils) and solvents can eat away at the coating.
    It’s only available in the US at the moment (At Home Depot)
    You can not use it on your skin. The MSDS makes it seem very similar to spray paint. So don’t inhale etc.
    It does not dry clear. It’s frosty, so windscreens, glasses, phone screens etc are out.
    People have used it on things like black shoes and boots. It leaves a frosty white residue. So dark items of clothing a probably not a great idea.
    The product recommends to not use it on electronics. This is probably because it’s not proven to work on it. It could react with certain other materials, it could damage your phone more than protect it – use at your own risk.
    It repels water. It will not make you float, it will not make your boat or surfboard go quicker.
    Also it comes off with friction, so any surfaces that are “high traffic” or get folds or wrinkles like shirts are no good.

    Realistically I think it has more industrial uses for corrosion protection and waterproofing than home uses.

    • It’s only available in the US at the moment (At Home Depot)

      Mate of mine at the CSIRO has been using it. Highlights a lot of the same points as you though, says it depends on use as the coating can come off easily with abrasion.

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