Stats Suggest Most League Of Legends Players Actually Aren't Jerks

Stats Suggest Most League Of Legends Players Actually Aren't Jerks

League of Legends' community doesn't exactly have the best reputation for sportsmanlike conduct or grace in defeat. It's a rough neighbourhood, folks say in hushed, fearful tones while chattering in internet speakeasies, especially for newcomers. Riot, however, would like to refute that claim. With numbers.

As part of an announcement that LoL will soon be giving a substantial Influence Point bonus to anyone who hasn't had their chat restricted or account banned during the 2014 season, Riot dropped an interesting statistic:

"As of 11/13/2014, 95% of active players in 2014 have never received a punishment of any kind. The vast majority of you have not received chat restrictions, ranked restrictions, game bans or permanent bans this year!"

Riot, of course, has poured a lot of effort into prying toxic ticks from LoL's playerbase and attempting to reform them, persuade them to change their ways. Most recently they enacted a system that locks people out of ranked play if they have earned a chat restriction due to poor behaviour. Reactions to that haven't been unanimously positive due to potential abuse of the system, but it's a sign that Riot wants everyone to make nice on its colossal playground.

But there's still work to be done. Even if only five per cent of players are jerks, that's a pretty big number when you consider League of Legends' size (67 million per month, 27 million active on a daily basis, according to Riot). It is, however, nice to remember that the grand majority of people are pretty cool. Riot added:

"We've recently been focused on addressing extreme cases of verbal toxicity, and will soon be testing additional systems that address gameplay toxicity like leavers, AFKs, and intentional feeders. However, it's important to keep in mind that players engaging in these behaviours really are not welcome in our community. Fewer than 1% of players have been escalated to a 14-day ban or permanent ban or even received a chat restriction."

All that said, there is the matter of punishments doled out versus punishments deserved. Some people who get slapped on the wrist deserve time in the slammer, so Riot's metric here isn't entirely indicative of actual moment-to-moment play. And, as ever, companies rarely report statistics that don't make them look good, so there's that to consider as well.

Still, Riot has more systems to punish poor sports planned, and I really like the idea of rewarding good behaviour too. You need both sides of the coin to really get people on board with an idea, so here's hoping Riot is able to strike an ideal balance. Eventually.


Comments

    Well, one of the main reasons it *feels* like there are a lot of jerks playing LOL is because journalism and other influential sites tend to be biased towards reporting when it's about something bad happening or steps being taken to combat toxic behaviour. There's also truth in the saying "vocal minority" since the people who aren't being jerks are usually more interested in playing the game and not making a fuss about things. Still, I'm curious to know what that percentage would be like if Riot wasn't offering an incentive to be nice.

      The toxic vocal minority is what distorts everything on the internet. I'm willing to bet that that 95% can be extended to the internet as whole, give or take a few percent, most of us just want to play/read/watch/consume and don't want to deal with bullshit.

      Most gaming sites tend to run articles exactly like this every couple of months after Riot announces another measure they're taking to tackle toxicity.

      The general perception of games like League, Dota and other online games tends to get spread by the gaming community. Someone plays a couple of games, has a bad experience and bitches about it on a forum/Twitter/in the comments of an article telling everyone that League isn't that bad. It only takes a tiny minority of dickheads for this sort of perception to spread.

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