These Matrix, Alien, And 2001 Claymation Scenes Are Perfection

These Matrix, Alien, And 2001 Claymation Scenes Are Perfection
2001 claymation? Come on now. (Screenshot: YouTube/Dust)

Over the past few weeks, you may have noticed an uptick in posts featuring short claymation scenes recreating iconic moments from famous sci-fi movies. We shared Star Trek II and Terminator 2: Judgment Day, and now we’ve reached the grand finale. Not one, not two, but three all-time sci-fi classics: 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Matrix, and Alien.

These little slices of clay-recreated heaven come from artist Joseph Brett, who did them to commemorate the fifth anniversary of online sci-fi platform Dust. Each takes a memorable scene from an even more memorable movie and recreates it in a medium it probably never should have been created in. And yet, somehow, they’re perfect. First up, we’ve got a clip that we think would make even Stanley Kubrick chuckle.

With that one, you have to appreciate that at least the monolith didn’t move. The apes do sure look really great though. Next up, get ready to say “Whoa” as the One learns how to dodge bullets.

For our money, this might be Brett’s best one yet. The camera movement is insane, the background (did you notice the helicopter?) is layered, and though Neo certainly looks like he lost a few pounds, the fact that the structure of his body stayed together as it moved around is really beautiful and impressive. And don’t forget that jacket!

Those two clips are being exclusively revealed here on Gizmodo. The one below came out last week — but it was so gross and weird, and since this is the end of the series, we figured why the heck not? You will for sure remember this moment from Ridley Scott’s Alien.

So gross but so cute. And also kind of funny — which has basically been the point with all of these awesome creations. If these shorts have gotten you in the mood for more sci-fi, head over to Dust, which is jam-packed with original stories of robots, space travel, aliens, technology gone wild, future dystopias, apocalypses, and more. Most of which are not in claymation.