Amazon MMO New World, As Told By Steam Reviews

Amazon MMO New World, As Told By Steam Reviews
Screenshot: Amazon / Kotaku

It’s a new world, if not exactly a brave one. New World, a massively multiplayer online role-playing game published by Amazon, is officially out today for PC, marking the first legitimately successful game release for the planet’s most valuable company. (Pour one out for the super-face-planted Crucible.)

New World didn’t have the smoothest road to launch. Extensive reports in Wired and Bloomberg detailed a development process rife with mismanagement, unqualified leadership, top-to-bottom overhauls, and general dysfunction, eventually leading to multiple delays. Early character designs of the MMO, which is set in a fictional realm reminiscent of colonial-era America, were deemed by tribal consultants as offensive portrayals of Native Americans.

In July, the game finally launched in closed beta, at which point some players summarily trolled the game with facts about Amazon. Also, running New World caused some players’ gazillion-dollar graphics cards to sputter into oblivion.

Despite it all, right off the bat, players have flocked to the game. As noted by Eurogamer, the MMO topped more than half a million concurrent players on Steam, an impressive figure that’s no doubt spurred by partnerships between Amazon and influential influencers. (Let’s see where these figures are in a month.)

Read More: After Crucible’s Flop, Amazon’s New MMO Is Actually Doing Well On Twitch

How the game is actually being received by players is a different story. At the moment, reviews on Steam are smack in the middle of “mixed,” with 53 per cent of roughly 5,400 respondents awarding the game a positive rating. Some lament its lack of “catgirls” and SEA (southeast Asia) servers, alongside other connectivity issues. Others are more positive, saying they “have [a] sword and i stab things,” actions described as “good.” And more still want to see features added to the game, like “Jeff Bezos skin,” while noting that the “Beff Jezos” username is already taken.

Here, as told by Steam reviews, is the initial verdict of New World.

Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku

Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku

Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku
Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku Screenshot: Valve / Kotaku

Comments

  • Average game at best, made by a terrible company. Once again Kotaku showing they care for Amazon money, then journalistic integrity.

  • The server cap discussion is interesting. Given the power and reach of Amazon’s hosting services, a hardware limitation seems… unlikely? Scaling your resources to expected demand is absolutely a thing, I’ve done it for work and will continue to in the future. So it surely can’t be cost… especially when MMOs live and die on critical mass; players have a gravity that is required for the thing to survive, so there’s no reason to turn those vital players away for some paltry server space for which they dominate the market, especially when the tourists disappear in coming months, leaving the game desperate to retain as many as they can.

    This leaves us with that requirement coming from… where? Shitty game architecture? Or a policy decision based on…. what else? Ill-informed concepts of server-based ‘community’? It’s a head-scratcher, that one.

    (Not that I have a stake, the game is pretty disappointing, you’re probably better off playing FFXIV or ESO, depending on how you weight your preference for action combat vs crafting/storytelling.)

    • Maybe they underestimated the popularity in certain regions? It wouldn’t be the first time. Like ‘Holy Heckballs, who would think that people in the Oceanic region want to play games?!’

      • Thing is, it should be so easy – ESPECIALLY for Amazon – to scale that up. And anyone with more than a passing familiarity with MMO launches would fully expect to have ten or even a hundred times your expected ongoing capacity available for launch.

        • You assume Amazon runs their servers. One of the big 4 banks used to administer them on Amazon’s behalf. I dont know if thats currently true or not, but it was within the last 5 years so no reason to think otherwise.

          If so, Amazon are basically clients of themselves for this. Which means an extra layer of junk to get new servers up and running.

          As it is, multiple regions, Australia included, have already had servers added. And the game is barely 24 hours old, thats a quick enough response for me.

          • Pre-2012 AWS was outsourced to Australian providers (depending on the business) before they started building their own local systems, but they still offshored as much of their cloud systems they can to reduce costs. So Oceanic is most probably Singapore.

      • Underestimate… Amazon the largest retailer and one of the biggest data miners in the world, underestimated sales targets?!?!? for a game that had pre-orders?!?!?

        This is as bad as Google not realising Pokemon Go would be popular when it’s teaser trailer was one of the most popular videos on YouTube, a company they own.

    • Technically a servers capacity is based on the software it’s running, I don’t think NWO has/had the software architecture of the Big MMOS to run dynamic instancing and phasing of virtual servers (aka sharding).

      But I think I read somewhere WoW runs 10k per realm (with all their tech)… so 2k feels really low.

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