What Are You Reading?

Good evening and good Tuesday, Kotaku readers. Tonight's open thread is of a themed variety, in which I might ask you a question, you might want to answer. Tonight's recurring question is "What are you reading?"

Me, I'm still bearing down on Don DeLillo's Underworld, an activity that I don't seem to have much time for. So I'm also re-reading Watchmen, easy to digest in chunks.

What about yourself? Want to share the comic books, novels and textbooks that are knocking your socks off? Want to see some suggestions? Take it to the comments and please talk amongst yourselves.


Comments

    The only Don DeLillo I've read is his short story "Videotape". But that was pretty awesome.

      I read White Noise, but can't remember a single thing about it...

        White Noise was a pretty cool book as I recall. I remember thinking 'If I ever have a band I'm gonna vote that we call ourselves 'The Airborne Toxic Event' and it'll be great'... for the first section of the novel dealing with said 'Event' and people's reactions to it.

        Then some crappy band shows up and steals the name and gets all famous and whatnot. I just can't win for losin'

    Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything by Steven D. Levitt & Stephen J. Dubner.

    I have a large collection of random books on my Kindle. This one in particular caught my attention.

    Really, it's an economist writing about various things outside of his field, using an economist logic. Being co-writing by a pretty decent journalist just means that it is ridiculously easy to digest things.

      *co-written.

      I hate catching typos right after I hit submit.

      I've been meaning to read that for a while now.

        I'm really enjoying it so far. They tend to take a few things that don't appear related on the surface and then show how they behaviour between the two is similar.

        It isn't always right, or at least I don't always agree with the logic, but it is an entertaining way of discussing a few interesting topics.

        Like how someone managed to diminish the power of the KKK by exposing their little secret society stuffs in the Superman radio series (I learned about that from an episode of QI, but these guys go into more detail).

    Making my way slowly through the 'Hellboy' comic series, but also reading William Gibson's 'Pattern Recognition', first in a sort of techno-espionage trilogy. I already read 'spook country', which had some amazing augmented reality tech woven into the story. Gibson, the man who invented the 'matrix' virtual reality concept, is still one of my favourite sci-fi authors

      I really enjoyed 'Neuromancer'.

        Neuromancer was great. I have to get my hands on some more of his cyberpunk

          Ive got his latest "zero history" sitting on the shelf next after Keith Richards life - both about alternative reality achieved through different mechanisms.

    The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

      me tooo

      I recently finished the sequel "The Wise Man's Fear". A brilliant series, i just hope the third book comes out in the foreseeable future.

    Just finished reading Prince of Thieves by Chuck Hogan (that's the book that Ben Affleck's movie The Town was based on, nothing to do with the old Kevin Costner Robin Hood movie :P).

    Now reading Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman

      The mini-series that Neverwhere is based on isn't too bad. From what I remember, the series came first. Then Gaiman wasn't too happy with the result so he redid it in novel form.

      I enjoyed both, although the book is definitely better.

      Then again, I am a bit of a Gaiman fanboy (despite never reading Sandman) and just finished reading American Gods for the umpteenth time the other day.

      I approve of Neverwhere! Although I think Anansi Boys was my favourite, just because it was so ridiculous. I'm reading Good Omens that he did with Terry Pratchett right now and am being thoroughly amused. Also reading Ender's Game because I heard it was really good and never read it when I was younger.

        Ender's Game is fantastic. The sequel Speaker for the Dead is also a very good book, although it has a very different tone. There's also Ender's Shadow which was written much later but covers the story of Ender's Game from Bean's perspective.

        There are other Ender books and short stories, I don't recommend them.

        Good Omens is one of my favourite books and there was some news a little while ago that it is getting adapted into a mini-series. This could be either really good, or rather bad.

    'Blood Meridian' by Cormac McCarthy.

    A beautiful, yet utterly brutal piece of writing. Two thumbs up, so far.

      Love that book. Hard going, but every sentence is amazing.

        A-greed. The Judge is quite the character!

      I love pretty much all of Cormac McCarthy's stuff (except The Orchard Keeper - couldn't quite figure out what the point of it was). My favourite is The Road, followed by the entire Border trilogy (The Crossing being my favourite of the 3). Then Blood Meridian after those ones.

    Aside from texts on illustration, I'm finally digging into 'The Anatomy of Evil' by Dr. Michael H. Stone.
    The book deals with and discusses criminology and the people who've committed crimes we classify as "Evil"

    Game of Thrones season 1 just finished, and boy what a finish. This was a great series and I have loved every episode, but I can't wait until next year for the next season. For my birthday my girlfriend got me the Song of Ice and Fire books so I'm going to start with them.

    My friends have asked me to wait, so that we can experience the tv show together, not knowing what would happen but I can't wait that long to see what happens next.

      Don't wait! Start reading them now!

      The books are absolutely brilliant.

      'A Song of Ice and Fire' is a brilliant series - I'm nearly at the end of the second book, and have the third ready to go. The TV series is awesome, but it's got nothing on the books.

      I'm almost finished Book 4 which will mean I'm "caught up" at least temporarily. Don't worry about waiting. The TV is even more fascinating when you pick up things you hadn't quite noticed while reading.

    I want more One Piece but since I'm up to date on the manga I have to wait for Oda to write the next chapter.

    Reading Superman Earth One in a couple of days too when my birthday rolls round next week.

    Until then I'm relying on Scott Pilgrim to get me through

    Just finished 'Babel 17' - EXCELLENT sci-fi based around language theory. A true classic.

    Now reading 'Use of Weapons' and really enjoying it. It's a slower pace but also quite rewarding sci-fi.

      +1 to anything by Iain M. Banks

      If you enjoy the style check out the other 'culture' books if you haven't already particularly Consider Phelbas and Matter.

        +1 to your +1

        Reading the Culture series now - very good if a little light on occasion. Strangely I came to Iain Banks after reading his book on whiskey which I'd also recommend - Raw Spirit.

        If you like Iain M Banks I'd also suggest anything by Peter F Hamilton (best Sci Fi I've read) or The Gap series by Stephen Donaldson.

    The World According to Clarkson, and its sequels. Very, very entertaining.

    I'm reading the new Tom Clancy, it's not up to his usual standard.
    I'm also reading through Book 2 of 'A game of thrones'.

    Also, drafts of several new peices of legislation, a couple of new employment award proposals, draft health regulation policy, an ammendment to immigration procedure, recommendations on employment stratagies, a couple of J&P's and about 200 cv's and associated contracts.

    Im reading The Zombie Survival Guide. Getting prepared and stuff.

      Have you tried "World War Z" by Max Brooks? A collection of folk tales from people who had survived a zombiepocalypse.

    More aptly, I am listening to an audiobook of Bram Stoker's Dracula. It's pretty chilling when someone actually describes what he does right next to your ear >.<

    Same thing i have to read every weekend "are you a frog like me" With the first kid it was a good book, now that I'm on my 5th I'm a little over it. Ive tried to talk them into a different book but no it has to be the bloody frog book!!

    I mean the sticky bits aren't sticky anymore and the fury bits are definitely sticky, what the hell is that teaching my toddler.

    I recently couldn't put down Player One by Douglas Coupland. He's an author who relates to gamers/programmers. J-Pod is another by him I really enjoyed.

    Was hoping to start on Game of Thrones, but finally finishing Cryptonomicon has caused me to start reading Stpehenson's Baroque Cycle.

    Finished Peter F. Hamilton's Void series (loved it) and now I've got to finally read Marley and me which has been sitting on the bedside table for 6 months.

    Currently reading the first book of the Trigon Disunity by Michael P. Kube-McDowell.

    I'm currently re-reading Fool's Fate, book 3 of The Tawny Man Trilogy by Robin Hobb (aka Margaret Astrid Lindholm Ogden) for the umpteenth time. I'm now at the point where I've read everything in my 4 bookshelves at least 3 times yet have no money to buy more. I've considered getting a Kindle but I would really prefer the feeling of turning the pages and holding the book in my hand.

    So until I've got more money, I might go back to Brent Week's 'The Night Angel" trilogy!

    I'm half way through "Toll the Hounds" the 8th book in Steve Eriksons Malazan Book of the Fallen.

    I don't really enjoy how everything's always doom and gloom with him and how the whole thing feels like an essay about his views of the world rather then a fictional novel but I do enjoy the world he's created and I'm too far into the series to stop now.

      His writing style is a breath of fresh air for the genre I feel. That being said, I had to take a break from his works at The Bonehunters. I found it heavy going after 5 straight of his books.

      I'm thinking of reading that lot next, what do you think? Well written and interesting or a bit of a hard slog?

        Yes, I highly recommend.

        He takes his time to world-build and the characters need your forbearance. It is complex and there's a lot of intertwining plot-points to the narrative, BUT it is thoroughly engrossing. Creative use of magic. Pretty much every character is a lusty shade of grey, as opposed to black and white. The combat is..uh... visceral, for want of a less cliche word, and unapologetically brutal. You finish reading a most skirmishes breathless. It's not for the first time epic fantasy reader, however...and that's not meant to sound elitist at all. It's just plain fact.

      I'm just digging into Toll the hounds, but I personally love Eriksons broad and conflicting views; he really is amazing at envisioning vastly different characters and mind-sets.

    Just started reading 'The internet is a playground' by David Thorne. Based on his blog 27bslash6.com

    Funny, offensive & brilliant.

    Reading The Heartless Stone by Tom Zoellner - it's a look into the history and practices of the diamond trade.

    Intending to read A Song of Ice and Fire series, for the obvious reasons.

    Last thing I read was the manual to Conduit 2.

    Don't think I'll be reading anything until I've finished playing that and it's time to read the manual to DKCR.

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