Come See What It’s Like To Play Microsoft Flight Simulator

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microsoft flight simulator
Image: Steam

Microsoft’s finally letting everyone show off what Microsoft Flight Simulator is like to play in the flesh. So, let’s show you what the experience is all about.

I’ve just updated the game all over again — that’s almost 100GB download overnight. So with the streaming embargo lifting at 5:01pm AEST / 7:01pm NZST / 3:01pm AWST, I’ll be able to show you what the experience is like if you’re trying to fly from Sydney to, say, Perth with a Xbox controller. Or New York to Tokyo. Dubai to Dallas. Wherever you want to go, really.

Basically anywhere you want to fly, you can. The trick is that not all the areas in Microsoft Flight Simulator have handcrafted airports, and not all landmarks are replicated in the game. The previous version, for instance, didn’t have the Sydney Harbour Bridge — but it did have the Opera House.

There’s plenty of other locations that are similarly missing bits and pieces, but on the whole it’s an incredible experience. I’ll be livestreaming shortly after this post goes up, so if there’s a location you want to see, let me know and we can check it out briefly. (You don’t have to actually fly from point A to point B in real-time if you don’t want to — the game does let you skip to the take-off, descent, approach, or whatever you’d like.)

Microsoft Flight Simulator officially launches on Tuesday for PC through Xbox Game Pass, the Microsoft Store and Steam.

Comments

    • Take-off, approach, descent, taxi, that sort of thing. But the fast travel only works if you have a pre-approved flight plan.

      So, for instance, you could say I just want to start my flight at X/Y longitude and latitude in the middle of the air, with no set destination. The game will let you do that, but you won’t have any fast travel points. But if you say, I want to fly from Hobart to Melbourne, then you’ll have fast travel points from the ascent, midway, and so forth.

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