Tagged With education

5

On any given day, CEO André Thomas arrives at his company Triseum's office in Bryan, Texas at nine in the morning. While this is when Thomas gets in, his work day usually starts hours before by checking sales on the company's educational video games. On one of the days that Thomas and I spoke, he told me he had been "driving all day" to visit a university to answer questions and help students who were using Triseum's games.

He says he usually tries to leave his office around seven, and even after eating dinner with his family, he'll return to work for a few hours. In the past, he was Head of Graphics for EA Sports games like Madden NFL. Now, he runs Triseum, a company whose principal goal is to completely replace textbooks with video games.

Shared from Theconversation

0

Playing games is ubiquitous across all cultures and time periods – mainly because most people like playing games.

Games involve rules, points, systems, as well as a theme or storyline and can be massively fun and engaging. And there is an increasing body of research that shows “gamification” – where other activities are designed to be like a game – can be successful in encouraging positive changes in behaviour.

3

"I wanted a game that hated me." That was how Sean Plott, also known as "Day9" in the professional gaming world, described the allure of Dota 2. Plott had made a name for himself in the days of StarCraft, where he taught players new and old how to better themselves at the strategy game. Now, he's the student again, trying to wrap his head around a game that's popularity is rivaled only by its vast and complicated intricacies.

0

Games can be powerful. They can be thought-provoking. They can be emotional. And they can teach. We might shake our heads at so-called "educational games", but they have proven themselves an effective way to inform and engage where other, more formal methods fail, especially when it comes to children.

Which is why projects like Vaxcards -- a competitive card game with multiple complexity levels, cooked up by a pair of Australian medical professionals, is so important in a climate where immunisation, once an unquestioned given, has found itself -- somewhat quizzically -- under assault.

1

I have no words. Alright, I have a couple. Interplay is mostly not a thing these days, but back in the 90s, the company was publishing hit after hit. Fallout, Baldur's Gate, Alone in the Dark, Descent... the list goes on. So to discover Interplay also put together an educational movie about games programming during its wonder years... well, let's just go to the tape, shall we?

31

I was terrible at mathematics in my adolescence. I hated it. I dropped it as a subject going into Year 10, though that's not super important, as I eventually dropped myself from the entire curriculum before that HSC. At the time, I had no idea I'd eventually become a games developer, or the lasting effect my disregard for algebra and trigonometry would have.

0

There has been an explosion of job opportunities in the mobile app and games industry, and the industry is showing no signs of slowing down. If you are looking to diversify your skills and grab a piece of the pie, we’ve got the information you need to get started – with Australia’s first and only post graduate course in Mobile Applications Development from Charles Sturt University and IT Masters.