The Awesome, 100% Accurate Planetary Orbits Of Blast Corps' Map Screen

Blast Corps, for the Nintendo 64, didn't seem to give much of a damn for accurate physics. You could drive on gas-giant Neptune and it had the lowest gravity of any of the game's extraterrestrial levels (it should be the highest). But as GameXplain marvellously demonstrates, the map menu is jaw-droppingly true to life.

The orbital periods of Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars and Neptune (the planets you may visit) -- and their satellites -- are all 100 per cent accurate. The Earth takes one minute to complete its trip around the sun; working from that, GameXplain calculated the orbital periods of the other celestial bodies and yep, they are all to scale, too.

The best part? Apparent retrograde motion even is included. Watch Mars' moon (Phobos? Or Deimos?) dip below its surface on the right, then re-emerge at 2:30. Celestial bodies travelling different orbits can appear to move in reverse when the one you're on overtakes its position.

It took GameXplain two hours and forty-five minutes of sitting in a map screen to prove all of this. Good work, for both them and for Rare, Blast Corps' developer.

Cool Bits -- Blast Corps' Shockingly Accurate Planet Orbits [GameXplain h/t Duderdude]


Comments

    My favourite N64 game. I played this for countless hours, good mixture of fun, difficulty, frustration and hilarity.

      +1 Couldn't agree more.

    This was actually revealed on the RARE website's letters page many years ago. I used to read it when they still made Nintendo games.

    Oh yeah - I'd go back and give it a spin all over again.

    Hell I would LOVE a HD remake of this. Getting all those platinum medals is probably my greatest achievement in life to date. I don't think I've had the time in life or the motivation to 100% a game since.

    this game was so damn good. The A team van as an unlockable was great and thinking you were finished the game only to find the moon and all the planets? man...

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