Banned From Twitch, 'Bikini Streamer' Finds Success (And Haters) On YouTube

Zoie Burgher knows exactly what you see when you tune into her Call of Duty streams. She knows that viewers judge her and people assume the worst because of how she presents herself. Burgher is currently blowing up on YouTube anyway, thanks to a recent ban on Twitch. Twitch, a popular livestreaming service, has rules specifying that streamers cannot show too much skin during broadcasts, much less focus on anything overtly sexual. Burgher, who is known for twerking while playing Black Ops 3, has been banned many times for violating that rule, with the most recent expulsion happening last weekend. While this turn of events may not sound surprising, Burgher contests that there's something suspect going on with the latest incident with her Twitch account:

As Burgher tells it, she hasn't actually been streaming on Twitch for the last month, maintaining a low profile leading up to Twitch's official convention. The last time Burgher was streaming, she claims, she was wearing the Swedish outfit pictured in the video above. In the email Burgher shared with me, Twitch lists the infraction as "porn or other sexually explicit content".

While Burgher recognises that the first few bans were legitimate, in an email exchange she described the latest ban as "unfair", since in her eyes she's technically been on good behaviour lately. She also notes that other streamers have worn similarly revealing clothes but have not gotten banned yet. I asked for specifics and didn't hear back from Burgher, and Twitch declined to comment as well.

Burgher's story has spread all over YouTube in the last month, with dozens of videos dedicated to dramatically reacting to her content, and collectively they have reached millions views.

Source: BlastphamousHD TV

Burgher's even made a playlist featuring videos where people roast her, and it includes titles like "Zoie, please go to a cam site" and "Zoie Burgher: a new cancer forms". That's tame, compared to the specific insults hurled at Burgher on social media sites and comments sections, where many have taken to calling Burgher a "slut" and "whore". Some cite YouTube's own community guidelines, which stipulate that "YouTube is not for pornography or sexually explicit content", though historically the enforcement of that rule is not very clear cut.

"The argument [against Burgher that] I've found most interesting is that what she is doing is detrimental to the image of female gamers," commented YouTuber Philip DeFranco in a video addressing the controversy surrounding Burgher. "With Zoie being the most-watched streamer on YouTube at the time that she's streaming, isn't she representative of female gamers? To which I think the argument is perception-wise yes, but also on the other end, is that fair? No one's ever looked at my videos and goes, 'Uh, that's so representative of guys on YouTube.'"

For detractors, it's not just that Burgher is playing Black Ops 3 provocatively. The peanut gallery keeps bringing up Burgher's meteoric rise — Social Blade, a YouTube metrics tracker, notes that Burgher has gained nearly 400,000 followers in less than a month. For people who toil away on YouTube for ages before gaining a following, seeing Burgher tear it up so quickly has proven infuriating. It's a misplaced jealousy that suggests viewers are being tricked into watching Burgher's content or that she's cutting corners to get a fame she does not "deserve", whatever that means. Meanwhile, actual YouTube giants make Burgher's subscriber count look laughable (no offence to Burgher).

"I stream, and all that entails: Storytelling, game commentary, chat interaction, fostering a sense of community... while in a bikini," Burgher said. Burgher's point is that while most pundits focus on her attire, they ignore the many elements that have made her stream successful, too. Archives of Burgher's streams sometimes focus on her sexuality, yes, but they also feature plenty of trash talking, self-aware jokes and kill streaks. Burgher isn't just entertaining people with her antics, she's also playing well:

Not that it stops the social media onslaught. Burgher's owning it. She jokingly refers to herself as a "thot" while streaming, and her Twitter bio says "brought to you by daddy issues", a jab at one of the most common insults hurled at her.

"What is the first thing people say about girls who are wearing 'too little' clothes, or about girls who are acting 'un-lady like'?" Burgher mused. "It's said they have no parents, they were raised badly, or never met their father. So I beat [people] to the punch line... because then maybe you'll sit back for a moment and think — wait, is there more to this?"

"I'm a college educated girl, and I could tell you more about the Middle Eastern crisis and its centuries-long dynastic feud between the Sunni and Shi'a than anyone you have ever met," Burgher said. "But first I have to do 50 more jumping jacks on live camera because this guy just donated 50 dollars. Platform is power, and I don't mind using sex appeal to get it."

I asked Burgher why she thinks she's become such a hot topic on YouTube, and she told me that it was just a matter of being at the right place at the right time.

"September is a slow month," Burgher explained. (To wit, one of the popular videos featuring Burgher outright says "there wasn't that much news today".)

"Most people familiar with consumer buying cycles (and therefore ad rates, the source of YouTube money) understand that the before-school consumption spike has been replaced with a media consumption lull as kids are back in school and no longer able to consume as much social media," Burgher continued. "I have risen from 3000 to 300,000 subscribers in 10 days [Editor's note: Now up to 400,000], and not just 10 days, but during a time when everyone (on YouTube) is suffering from lower views, and lower audience interaction... people are competing not only for views and subscribers, but attention. Once there is sufficient attention on a subject, other YouTube channels start covering it in an attempt to capitalise on the views."


“At the end of the day, people could be getting entertained anywhere on the internet.”


Burgher's insinuation is a deeply ironic one: While some accuse her of weaponising her sex appeal for personal gain, the truth is more that other YouTubers are exploiting her looks for better thumbnails, and saucier news/reaction videos. Every time a YouTuber features Burgher, they increase her profile more and more. YouTube and social media are complaining about a behemoth that it created in the first place.

"At the end of the day, people could be getting entertained anywhere on the internet — even on the pornographic sites people suggest as alternatives for content, but they're not; they're watching me," Burgher said. "So I will take their good faith and invest it into myself to evolve and grow as a person and YouTuber."

"I can have a great personality all I want, but if no one's around to experience it, how great is it really?" Burgher said. "I aim to get an audience, and I've done that."

On Twitch, Burgher's story would have been an old one: The internet has been misguidedly arguing about livestreaming "camwhores" for ages, trying to police what a woman should or should not wear on-camera. Years ago, Burgher's ban would have closed the latest chapter in that saga quickly, but instead it has spilled onto YouTube. Guess you can say that YouTube's own livestreaming service has finally made it.


Comments

    I read something the other day that really hit me, it was something like:

    The male gaze only finds sexualization of women appealing if it's nonconsensual. Otherwise it's "sluttiness" and is maligned.

    That's not a direct quote. But with that in mind I say: good on her for owning it. She's achieving her goals so more power to her.

    Last edited 27/09/16 12:03 pm

      The male gaze only finds sexualization of women appealing if it's nonconsensual.

      Sorry but what an absolute load of horseshit.

        I'm with this guy,

          Looks like I just tied a brick to my reputation around here and thew it off a bridge. I don't really care, though. I still see truth in the statement. Generally, gamers don't care if their characters or merchanising are sexualised - in fact, if anyone tries to take that away from them, they throw a hissyfit - but as soon as a woman who is in the gaming scene tries to sexualise herself on her own terms, many of the same people throw their hands in the air and claim that it's distasteful and the women doing it are "sluts".

            Nah man, you haven't done that at all.

            I think you're thinking too generally. The people who do the sort of stuff you mention are a very very vocal minority.
            In my experience the majority of gamers don't give a shit either way - they just play the games. I mean, look at GTA, for example. Bikini girls on most of the promo stuff, but the main thing anyone cared about was the game.

            Thing is, sex sells, as much now as ever.

            The only time i will raise an eyebrow is if game makers REALLY go out of their way to portray women as sex objects (eg, rapelay style games).
            Just because a women isn't wearing much, fictional or otherwise, doesn't mean she isn't empowered. At the end of the day it's a gimick.
            Men shouldn't feel bad about being enticed by the gimmick, and women shouldn't feel bad about utilising it.
            I'm rambling.
            Shut up, loops.

              I think we're in agreement. Male gamers either look past or are enticed by GTA bikini girls, so they should be able to do the same to bikini streamers.

              The thing is, in my experience people are more vocal about shaming bikini streamers than they are about criticising game promo/content.

              Now, you may be right in saying I'm drawing a misguided connection as to which parts and what proportion of the gaming community are vocal about such things.. but the disparity undeniably exists.

              Edit: Spolling

              Last edited 27/09/16 8:27 pm

                I think you're drawing a lot of conclusions based on the idea that these people must hate women in order to say mean stuff to her. So many people who get really pissed off about this stuff are just having a knee jerk reaction brought on by lifetimes of being treated like pathetic losers. Game marketing has always had a huge element of 'put a stripper in there somehow, gamers are so desperate they'll buy anything with tits near it'.
                It's very easy to read these over reactions as misogyny and yes that is out there, but you've got to remember that society treats men like morons and that's where a lot of this backlash comes from. I think for a lot of people it's an attempt to get people to stop expecting us to hand over all our money because we saw some side boob.
                I mean stop and really think about how insulting 'bikini streaming' is as a concept. Sex sells is this totally normal marketing attitude, it's considered irrefutable even though there are trillions of examples of sex not selling. As a man who isn't controlled by his dick it's very hard to not be insulted by this sort of stuff and I'm bombarded with it every day. As a woman it's very hard not to be insulted because it's insisting that society values their ability to be fucked above all else.

                I'm not denying that shitty people exist or trying to justify people's responses, being a jerk is the wrong way to handle it. I'm certainly not asking for sympathy either. However it's important to understand while it may come across that way that men don't naturally hate women or anything dumb like that. Most of us simply hate women being thrown at us just like women hate being expected to throw themselves at us. The objectification of women insults everyone involved. If she wants to jiggle for money I'm ok with that but there are a lot of people out there who will have big issues with this stuff that run deeper than not liking women.

                Last edited 29/09/16 11:22 am

                  That's the thing, though.. they are saying mean (though I would lean to 'hateful' or 'disgusting') things to her because she's not behaving in a way that they feel a woman who is streaming video games should behave. They are, in essence, trying to control how she presents herself. So, while they may not hate women, they are furthering the notion that a women must only present herself as the community (the vocal culprits predominantly being male) sees acceptable.

                  It must be difficult existing with this duality as a woman. On one hand, you have big media companies using your genders' sexuality as window-dressing to promote their products, which is commonplace and (except when it gets absurd) largely accepted or ignored by the community. Then on the other, you have some women trying to use their sexuality to promote or further their own ambitions being told that they shouldn't behave inappropriately or they risk being attacked either by words, or worse.

                  You may be right in saying that sexualised advertising doesn't work as well as the companies think it does and, yes, there are many men who are sick of having it pushed in their face as a lazy marketing tool but, generally speaking, there has been less vitriolic criticism leveled at sexuality in marketing/content than there has towards women in the communities. And when it's directed at the women who own it, it is far more personal, hateful and violent.

                  If men are sick of being subject to lazy, presumptuous marketing gimmicks, then they should be going after the companies that perpetuate this in their marketing. They should definitely not be attacking the women in the community, regardless of how few clothes they are wearing.

                  Now, I'm not saying that all men in the community feel this way. Thankfully, it is a minority - a vocal one, but still a minority. But the problem undeniably exists and, if you count yourself among the decent, rational individuals that oppose this sort of thing, then it needs to be called out wherever it exists.

                  Last edited 30/09/16 12:34 pm

                  @mogwai I'm not saying it's the right answer or that it shouldn't be called out, simply that there is a deeper answer than 'they want to control women' or general misogyny. It's like saying terrorists just hate freedom. That's fine if you want an excuse to shoot people but if you want actual, meaningful resolution you've got to force yourself to understand them beyond the 2D villains they first appear as.
                  Honestly I find the idea that they want to control her to be very over dramatic. They want to control her in the same sense that I want to control you by telling you not to piss on the street corner. Her actions upset them and they want her to stop/take it somewhere else. They're being really shitty about it and that is technically trying to control her, but if I called it oppression I'd be insulting anyone who has actually lived under oppressive circumstances.

                  You may be right in saying that sexualised advertising doesn't work as well as the companies think it does and, yes, there are many men who are sick of having it pushed in their face as a lazy marketing tool but, generally speaking, there has been less vitriolic criticism leveled at sexuality in marketing/content than there has towards women in the communities. And when it's directed at the women who own it, it is far more personal, hateful and violent.

                  I think that's because marketing/content is generally perceived as being one way. You can't really interact with say, Capcom, because it's a big, faceless company that we're all painfully aware won't listen to us. That's why resentment towards this stuff builds up under the surface and comes out hard when they finally get a chance to vent it on someone.
                  Ultimately it's not an organised front it's just a million knee jerk reactions. We see them as a group but they'll never 'go after' anyone since they're not actually working together. They're just a thousand people who can't walk past without muttering 'cam whore' and throwing in the same two cents. An accidental hate mob.
                  Similar to the way everyone responded to that Gal*Gun article the other day by joking at the expense of Gal*Gun players. It wasn't a united front bent on otaku-shaming it was just a bunch of people who can't walk past without laughing at the idea of some pillow humping creep hastily hitting the boss key as his mum walks in.

                  For some reason I can't reply to your lower message.. maybe the indent got too far. Edit: it seems to have placed it here anyway (small victories)

                  there is a deeper answer than 'they want to control women' or general misogyny.

                  I know where you're coming from, but I believe that (and this is more opinion than anything) that there's more layers to it again.. You have the superficial misogyny, then the deeper answer that you talk about, but that they both exist due to a deeper, insidious way in which society as a whole view women. But, again, that's just the way I see it and this at risk of spilling into a discussion on gender roles in today's society.. so let's leave that there. But I see your point.

                  I think that's because marketing/content is generally perceived as being one way. You can't really interact with say, Capcom, because it's a big, faceless company that we're all painfully aware won't listen to us.

                  If there is enough outrage, they will listen. Look at Konami refusing to release DOAX in the Western market. Now, developers refusing to release a game to its fans? That is not a good result. But it shows that they are listening. A more positive example is perhaps Overwatch. They heard the criticisms and made an effort to present a balance. There's heaps more examples, but it shows that developers are listening, if slowly. Let's hope this trickles down to marketing etc. and that at the same time other industries start to make their own changes.

                  Ultimately it's not an organised front it's just a million knee jerk reactions. We see them as a group but they'll never 'go after' anyone since they're not actually working together.

                  That is a problem in itself though. These people may not be an organised mob but they don't have to be. The problem is their views are common enough that, when voiced individually, they create a large storm of hate. You can be sure that their casual misogyny (or if you prefer 'impatience' or 'frustrations' with women) are not solely contained toward the streamers they're attacking from behind their computers. For many of them, that behaviour will be apparent (but maybe to a lesser degree) in their general interactions with women in day to day life. Within this demographic of men that call women 'cam whores', you'll find that some of the same people that think revenge porn is ok, that think a woman was 'asking for it' if she gets assaulted while drunk or wearing revealing clothing, or get aggressive when a women refuses their advances, the list goes on. And they all might act individually, but as a whole, they are the people that make women feel unsafe, undervalued, ignored or (dare I say) oppressed. I see it as a symptom of something deeper.

                  (By the way, thanks for engaging my posts in a constructively critical way)

                  Last edited 30/09/16 4:38 pm

            Not really, it's not really even aimed at you honestly. I'm just tired of male gamers being painted as people who demean women who sexualise themselves or who negatively react. I do believe the gaming scene was like that at one stage, a while ago, honestly. I do think times have changed though significantly. One need only look at say, the way videogame covers are designed, an almost complete lack of semi-nude women for example on the covers (Japanese games not included, talking western releases here). There's *always* going to be that pathetic subset of males and to some extent females who do, by all means, to deny that would be ludicrous, but the sheer majority of men and women out there, have no issue and endorse, applaud and encourage men and women to take control of their sexuality and own it. I've heard too many people these last few years trying to demonise men for this sort of thing, in a generalised way and it's becoming tiresome as hell. But those who demean women who do stuff like this, need to grow up and get a grip on reality. It's just a shame that the idiot minority have louder voices than the sane, normal majority I guess.

            Last edited 27/09/16 9:01 pm

              You're right, things are getting better, but to women in the community it probably feels like a slow gruelling battle. But the conversation is growing - the fact we are talking rationally about this is testament to that. The problem does still exist, though, as the response to Zoie's videos illustrates, so whenever it rears its ugly head it's important to call it out.

              Last edited 28/09/16 12:51 am

                I think the real point is that she's supposedly be running a gaming channel but is blatantly using her body to inflate the views and money rather than the gaming content and then acting surprised that she gets banned for it. I wouldn't bat an eyelid if she just owed it and streamed for a porn site, but I find the disingenuity itself makes the whole thing somewhat vulgar... oh well at least all the news sites are cashing in on her boobs too... kotaku heh

                Last edited 30/09/16 6:37 pm

            You are either a female SJW, or the biggest beta white knight I've ever seen

              You're either twelve years old, or just an a-hole.

              lol, 'beta'. You might as well hang a sign around your neck reading 'twat'.

      Personally, I find consent pretty damn appealing indeed.

        Every sane, normal person should. If one doesn't find consent appealing, one needs to be locked in a cell somewhere...

      Ah, that would explain why mags such as Playboy and Penthouse were so unpopular. The women represented agreed to be in the magazines, so nobody was interested in them; people really were buying Playboy for the articles.

      Actually I think you're partly right. Certainly there's a certain kind of guy who only gets off on rape porn. However, I think that sort of guy is inclined to regard women as sluts even when it IS nonconsensual. Some such suffer under the misconception that a nonconsensual woman is, somehow, pretending and in reality is actually enjoying the nonconsensual sex.

      Basically, some guys are real jerks.

      Certainly I do agree that what she chooses to do on her own channel is her own damn business and it doesn't make her a "slut" (equivalent male term: stud.)

    Go girl. You do whatever you fracking want. You aren't hurting anybody.

      Besides the point she is telling the next generation of women (or current for that matter) that showing /Selling your body for views and money is ok.

      It can be debated then this is no more than what Jessica Nigri does on a daily basis with Cosplay.
      But she is expressing her love for characters albeit in a sexy promiscuous waymost of the time, but still somewhat tasteful.

        Explain to me how promiscuity is not tasteful.

          a 10 year old emulating her Favorited streamer for one.

            Why is a ten year old wearing a bikini not tasteful?

              Have you got a ten year old girl? Do you think that a bikini is more appropriate in that age range vs a one piece?

              Are you trolling and being filthy? Seriously, I'm as liberal as they come, however, my girls are not wearing bikini's until they have jobs that allow them to purchase them with their own funds.

              Either way, your comment does not sit well with me.

                Hang on dude. I have a 13 year old daughter.

                If she wears a two piece, that is her wish. The problem is the sleazy trash who ogle.

                So should I put her in a burkini?

                  that not what I said at all.
                  the comment on prepubescent girls in bikinis is what threw me.

                  You know that regardless of your childs age, you still have responsibilities as a parent to ensure they are not exploited?A bikini has a time and a place and I don't think that they are appropriate on young kids.

                  If they're that age and want to wear g strings and the like, is that acceptable?

                  I'm in my mid 30's - called me old fashioned in this day and age, but my kids do what I tell them, when I tell them, they are quiet and polite and use their manners and they respect my judgement calls on what appropriate.

                  My nephew wants to play GTA V, that's his wish - but he isn't old enough and it isn't acceptable.

                  Just because its their wish, doesn't make it right.
                  We are adults for a reason.

                  Last edited 29/09/16 9:02 am

        Besides the point she is telling the next generation of women (or current for that matter) that showing /Selling your body for views and money is ok.

        But that is ok...

        You may find it distasteful, but that doesn't make it not ok.

        Last edited 27/09/16 1:42 pm

        she is telling the next generation of women (or current for that matter) that showing /Selling your body for views and money is ok
        Well it works for the Kardashian/Jenner clan.

      Besides herself, her sense of value as a person on the internet. What happens when she ages, will she have to get another job, will she be able to offer anyone anything on the internet?

      I mean consciously she probably understands that it's just horny teens on the internet but subconsciously I don't really know if it will affect her and how she sees herself.

      Don't get me wrong i like boobs and butts like the next guy, but I can't say that this wont have a negative effect what so ever on people who choose to do this.

      Maybe it would be better if she could find something that is more closely linked to her personality rather than her body? That seems like a much safer and more reliable/stable way to offer entertainment to people on the internet to me.

        While I agree with you, she is in the same boat as any media personality. She is only relevant as long as there is a market for her product, whether that be her body, personality, fake persona or a combination off the lot. I'm not saying its right or wrong, let alone future proof. We dont know all the story here, (well I don't) so I cant judge the lady for doing what I would do in a heartbeat if I had the gender and body.

    This is always a hot topic.

    Twitch has the power to moderate what they want.
    They did so back when male streamers were playing topless or wearing a Wife Beater/skivvy/Tank top. This with a major male dominated space, and males got moderated to wear clothes.

    Woman on the hand get a free pass to be cam (sorry .not sorry) Whores.

    The woman who wear clothes and have decent content, and engage more than showing some Bewb and flirt are the ones making woman in the gaming-sphere a great place.

    The above are creating a new generation telling them to be OK to sell them selves which im not ok with, im ok with woman being confident with their body. Shit im ok with the chubby Harley Quinn cos play at comic con or supernova, they have guts. These are just people cashing in when the iron is hot.

    Last edited 27/09/16 12:26 pm

      The woman who wear clothes and have decent content, and engage more than showing some Bewb and flirt are the ones making woman in the gaming-sphere a great place.

      And they have their audience. Nobody is taking that away from them.

        fair enough, but you cant say this wont hurt woman being taken seriously in gaming at the very least.

          I can and do say it. As you stated there are already plenty of well known fully clothed female presenters in gaming related spheres. All the women at Rooster Teeth and the Polaris channel to name a few. Just because there are other females going about it with less clothes doesn't take anything away from the fully clothed. They cater to different markets.

      Its not a hot topic, its a topic that juveniles and people who think PCMR is a thing to strive to be get upset about. the rest of us either watch it if we're interested or ignore it and only find out about it when Kotaku does an article on it.

      Also, just an aside what you're ok and not ok with, she and the streamers like her, they don't care. and guess what - your opinion on the matter. doesn't matter. you're not the arbiter of what is and isn't acceptable behavior. pull your head in.

    Let's be real here - the root of the issue is how the west views sexuality and the female body, not what Zoie is doing. She is using what she has to her own advantage to get where she wants to - and people want it! It's honestly no different to using your mind, your muscle, your wit or any other aspect of who you are as a person to do what you want to. If we all just got over this rediculous taboo the west still seems to have over sex and nudity, maybe we'd stop revisiting this bullshit about how this is "such a problem".

    Hats of Patricia, this article was super well written, unbiased and well informed. You continue to create fantastic content left and right and are one of my favourite journalists in the gaming space.

    “I’m a college educated girl, and I could tell you more about the Middle Eastern crisis and its centuries-long dynastic feud between the Sunni and Shi’a than anyone you have ever met,” Burgher said. “But first I have to do 50 more jumping jacks on live camera because this guy just donated 50 dollars. Platform is power, and I don’t mind using sex appeal to get it.”Of course she can do whatever the hell she wants, but she's got the power dynamic the wrong way round. The person giving the money in that scenario is the one with the power. They're able to get an intelligent, college educated person to dance around in their underwear just by throwing a little bit of money at them.

    Last edited 27/09/16 12:54 pm

      Not at all, she knows how to squeeze rubes for money. If she doesn't mind how she does it she's absolutely in control.

      This idea that everyone involved in some tangent of the sex industry is somehow a victim needs to die, it's toxic to the idea that are capable of making their own independent decisions about what's right for them.

      I'm not saying there aren't people who don't do what they do out of desperation or under duress but there is an equal measure of people who do what they do because they enjoy it.

        I'm not talking about the sex industry at all, where did you get that from? I was deliberately trying to avoid any such analogies given that the 'empowered or victim' sex worker discussion is entirely irrelevant to a discussion about what someone that streams games for a living is wearing while they are streaming. The idea that a streamer who is wearing whatever the fuck they want to wear is somehow tangentially involved in the sex industry is pretty terrible.

        The behaviour in question could be anything at all, think about it in more abstract terms - if you say to someone 'do this and I'll pay you $x' and they then go ahead and do it, you've purchased power over them; purchased control over what they are going to do. It's not long lasting power or control, and certainly the situation can be reversed (for instance if the other person says 'if you pay me $x I'll do this' - small but important difference), but in this scenario, as she phrased it, the buyer is in control of her behaviour.

        "But first I have to do this because someone just donated $50."

        Last edited 27/09/16 2:50 pm

          I go to work everyday because my boss pays me. Guess I've empowered him as well.
          No wait I'm selling my talents and abilities to him, just like she is.

    I'd like to think that I'm not the only one who is fed up with all this "x-shaming" nonsense. "Shaming" has become the new gilded turd suffix, taking the crown from "-gate".

    If you want to form an opinion about someone based on their actions, just do so.

    The "judgement, judgment BUT I'm not x-shaming" might actually become the new "I'm not racist BUT".

      It reminds me of the old Jerry Springer 'don't you judge me!' cry.

    Surely there's gotta be a ripped guy wearing just a jock strap with his own Twitch channel???

    Personally I find reaction video channels alot more horrid than someone shaking what her mother gave her,

      "I'll rehost content with my face in the corner, that makes it original! Money plz!"

    I wish I could do what she's doing... but I'm a guy... and not attractive.

      Same here - also add to that list "not intellegent" and "not talented"

    I get why Twitch don't want this sort of content on their platform but I always find it strange that other Twitch streamers get so bent out of shape over it. The people whose entire careers are about forming one way connections with large groups of people so they'll give them money get up in arms because a moderately attractive woman does the same thing using sex appeal instead of friendship.
    Give me $100 for my attention because you like watching me play GameBoy and I'm a legit entertainer tapping into a new media market, but give me $100 for my attention because I make you horny and I'm undermining the integrity of the platform. I don't care what people do with their money or what sort of content they create, that's between them, the service hosting the exchange and their fans, but it seems crazy to me that 'legit' streamers unintentionally use stripper tactics to build their following/make money while still looking down on cam whores.

      Jealousy is a powerful thing.

      Last edited 27/09/16 6:21 pm

    I think there is some irony in that the people calling others sluts and whores are also the type who were all 'tits or gtfo'. No girls allowed. Somehow this must scare or threatens them.

    I think the real problem is a generation of people obsessed with fame ,providing 'content' and 'monetising' every fucking thing. It's clinical and disturbing.

    But how obnoxious do you have to be to defend/justify/explain yourself by flat out saying the reader will never meet another person better at xyz than her?

    fuck i wish i had a vagina! I've already got man boobs I would make a killing on these sites as a cam whore! Yes this girl is a cam slut no if's or butts. Ironically she makes more money associating it with gaming then being an actual cam whore on a 18+ cam site ,etc. I'd be cool with this if she wasnt making money, no wait I'd still have an issue with it.... just become a stripper bitch, you're already half way there..... do you honestly think any of these men respect you? Also why can't i wear shorts at work but girls can wear skirts? man this sexism thing is fucked

    if you want to see what a respected, decent gamer chick looks like, check out Alana Pearce (@Charalanahzard) IMHO she is better looking too, not just because she respects herself, she's also a home grown aussie gal kicking ass in the US.

    I don't get the appeal of this at all. I mean... if you're watching this then you obviously have access to the internet. If you have access to the internet then it's not all that hard to find lots and lots and lots of pictures and videos of scantily clad girls about the place, many of whom are a lot more attractive than this one. So why?

      you can explain it away as watching a gaming stream when your mom comes in ahahaha

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