Film Victoria Boosts 14 Games With Just Over $815,000

With PAX just around the corner and the state already in the thick of Melbourne International Games Week, Film Victoria has announced that 14 games will be sharing over $815,000 in fresh funding.

Four of the 14 projects are receiving funding from Film Victoria for new stages of development, while the other new are getting funding for the first time. Readers will probably be familiar with some of the first four: they include Untitled Goose Game; The Forgotten City, the standalone spin-off of the Skyrim mod that won a national screenwriting award; Dead Static Drive, one of the standout games at PAX the last two years running; and Dawnblade, a mobile Diablo/Torchlight-esque aRPG.

The Journey To Turn A Skyrim Mod Into A Standalone Game

The last time we spoke to Nick Pearce, he was flying on a high. The Forgotten City, a mod that he'd spent more than 1700 hours building, had just won an Australian Writers' Guild award. It was the first Australian screenwriting award given to a video game mod, a staggering accomplishment given it was a mod borne entirely out of love.

Read more

7 of the remaining 10 games that received funding included:

  • Beyond the Veil
  • Eri’s Forest
  • Pocket Skate
  • Kana Quest
  • Monsta Makin (working title)
  • Totem Teller
  • Pico Tanks

The three other projects include a new game from Samurai Punk (The American Dream, Screencheat), a card-based game from Twice Different, and a third company which was not named. I've followed up with Film Victoria on that company, though, and I'll update this story once that information comes to light.


Comments

    This is a great initiative and I'm glad Victoria is putting money towards the industry at a time when the Australian Government has demonstrated apathy towards homegrown games.
    Our government at large really is out-of-touch with the industry and associated generation and it further demonstrates that they don't/can't represent many of us politically.
    I mean, I voted for TURNBULL, not Morrison. I'd never vote for a highly Christian PM in 2018, as if we want to go off in that direction, we may as well be all still wiping arse barehand.

      That said - people in general just don’t care as much about the government funding the entertainment sector as much as healthcare or public safety. And nor should they - because these are ultimately non-essential things, and a small sector besides.

      It’s something I appreciate a government doing, but I think funding entertainment should be a much lower priority than ensuring adequate public health or social services/support. That matters to everybody, not just Gen Y (or whatever) who like video games. I’m certainly not going to vote for somebody just because they promise to give grants to video game developers. Politics is bigger than that and much more important than single issues.

        I feel the issue is relevant to public funding as it is an investment in a local aspect to our economy. More money coming in via a sector that NEEDS to be fed cash in order to make cash means more (potential) Tax generated funds to feed back into public sectors like health and education (preferably in its reform).
        Whilst I agree that the priority is the public sectors, the gaming industry needs to be one of our nation's "passive incomes". We need to occupy more niches as a scoiety and we don't market our entertainment accordingly. We rush it out, throw it out to the ether, and then start something new. We have very little legacy in the entertainment sector outside of Home & Away, Neighbours, and fundamentalist Catholic overlord Mel Gibson.

          It's more than just funding a sector that "needs" it. How do you ensure the funding stays there and does make a return?

          There was a real uproar back in the day when Gillard was still in office.

          Bonds got finding to help acquire equipment they needed for their operations.

          Not long after, Bonds shift the jobs off-shore, sent the machines there as well, and left the local workers out in the cold.

          When it comes to any form of funding, underpinning it all is a need to ensure it doesn't become a free lunch.

          Then you have players like Graham Burke who tarnishes people who still do the right thing.

          The first Lego movie was made with government support yet when it came time for release Burke delayed it for months.

          Even though I'm sure Animal Logic was well above board, thanks to another actor in the same sector, return on that investment (mainly from tax via ticket sales) was diminished as I'm sure many chose to pirate or (as I often do) import the movie when it is on BluRay.

            Yes, that's the issue. When more money comes in, it isn't often reflected in the support of public sectors. I mean, look at youth homelessness and social well being initiatives across most of our states: They are willfully being rolled back to the point of people's lives being endangered.
            Nor does the money often stay here. We have a real problem with that. Look at the Energy Crisis. That is completely the result of selling our own resources to a foreign nation who has then sold our own energy back to us at a premium. That is resultant off a very one sided sale that brought in one dose of cash at the expsense of futrue earnings and the financial stability of our peeps.
            Yet video games are different. The sale platforms are quite defined now, many people the world over tend to spend more time buying games than playing them (Steam), and with a little nudge, we start a legacy that can only get bigger and better. If we push ourselves and have the backing and infrastructure, we can and will succeed. We are a nation full of talent.

            I mean, people LOVE Australians! They love our accents and our attitude towards life. Why aren't we into ourselves as much? Why do we happily sit back and go "It's too late and the government will just squander the money anyway" instead of affecting change? Why don't we put ourselves out there more?

              Nor does the money often stay here. We have a real problem with that. Look at the Energy Crisis. That is completely the result of selling our own resources to a foreign nation who has then sold our own energy back to us at a premium.

              Er, there is fault on the local side as well.

              More recently AGL decided to shut down one of their old coal plants as they move to green energy.

              That would be a good move, were it not for the fact the infrastructure is a mess and doesn't favour the few green alternatives that actually exist making the move more political than beneficial.

              Why aren't we into ourselves as much? Why do we happily sit back and go "It's too late and the government will just squander the money anyway" instead of affecting change? Why don't we put ourselves out there more?

              Because many want change - but too few want to be the ones that bring the change.

              As it stands, the Coalition is the best of a bad bunch and that is not a good thing. The members within know this, that is why their policies are half baked at best. They know there is no better competition so they don't have to try any harder.

              What is needed is a new party willing to make the hard choices but also put the effort in for the proper implementation.

              If this sounds familiar then yes, I speak of Gamers 4 Croydon where it was found no major party will change the status quo so a new party was formed to finally get some real momentum.

              We are in a time where we need the same thing to happen but at a federal level. But I don't see this happening.

              Too many are just happy to bounce from one party to another on a whim. Too few are willing to jump in and say "Enough of this ****!"

              ((Sorry, pressed Reply before I was finished)).

              Anyhow, I think I've said enough here. At the rate I'm going, there will be more posts here from me than there are ads here.

                And there are a lot of those here...
                I have designs on being mayor in the future (true story!) so, despite my dual UK citizenship, (which I intend to keep), I'd like to work politically.
                Maybe we need to band together and start a "Politaku" (except not that) party to inflict change...

          My question is - how much would video games contribute to the economy by way of tax revenue or employment? It’s unlikely we’re going to compete with the big US studios or with nightmare mobile game development juggernauts with sweatshop programming halls in China. We’re likely to just have loads of indie studios that won’t make a massive impact.

          I’m not suggesting we shouldn’t find it, just that it isn’t a priority and probably never will be because it’s just not a big contributor to the economy and probably won’t be. The contrapoint is that without investment it won’t grow - but at some point investing to prop up a failing industry that can’t compete with the global market with limited returns ends up being money wasted.

          Nothing in entertainment or the arts guarantees a return, either for the sector or the government supporting them. As a result it’s always going to be a lower priority than healthcare, social services and welfare, or industries that do benefit the economy. If Studio IndieGame goes out of business it’s sad, but if MegaCorp shuts up shop it’s a disaster.

            People buy wine. Vinyards are small biz. They survive. The valley here is lousy with them.
            It's still niche. I'd argue more time is spent on games than drinking wine.
            Despite the size and scope, an industry is still industry and every industry feeds other industry.
            Insurance companies need lawyers, lawyers need coffee and prostitutes etc.

            We need to stop diminishing the arts just because they don't put food in the mouths of the many. A society is a big, beautiful hollistic organism. If we can spend money on religious based initiatives with tax dollars, then we can also spend it on things that actually FEED the economy instead of paying lip service.

              I don’t agree with propping up religion either.

              I’m not advocating no funding - I’m just explaining why most people don’t care about funding for it. It’s still a special interest niche area and if it isn’t a political priority that’s perfectly okay and indeed a rational decision.

        Politics is bigger than that and much more important than single issues.

        Unfortunately, that is how the majority seem to vote.

        Some vote for the Coalition because of their better economic skills.

        Some vote for Labor their better NBN plan.

        Some vote for the Greens as they consider the environment more important.

        The old expression, "The needs of the many" doesn't just apply to people. It applies to factors as a whole as well.

          "Some vote for the Coalition because of their better economic skills."
          *Perceived* economic skills. They get a surplus because they sell public utilities for one off payments, and then the next government has to deal with the long term loss in revenues

            *Perceived* economic skills.
            The Liberals aren't apathetic to games, they're down right hostile.

            You keep telling yourself that. The sky will remain not plaid though.

      The Liberals aren't apathetic to games, they're down right hostile. So far they have killed not one but two games funding grants. First Abbot and the federal one, then more recently Marshall and the SA Games Grant

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