PlayStation Unveils Game Pass Competitor That Will Let You Play Old Games

PlayStation Unveils Game Pass Competitor That Will Let You Play Old Games
Photo: T3 Magazine, Getty Images

Forget “Netflix for games” for a sec. The conversation to watch this week is “Hulu for games.” Yes, Sony has finally lifted the curtain on its eagerly anticipated overhaul of PS Plus and PS Now, formerly known under the code name “Spartacus.” The new service has three tiers, with the third and most expensive at $US100 ($139) a year letting subscribers play PS1, PS2, PS3, and PSP games from Sony’s back catalogue.

Here are the details via a new PlayStation Blog post:

PlayStation Plus Essential

  • Provides the same benefits that PlayStation Plus members are getting today, such as: Two monthly downloadable games, exclusive discounts, cloud storage for saved games, online multiplayer access.
  • There are no changes for existing PlayStation Plus members in this tier.
  • Price: $US9.99 ($14) monthly / $US24.99 ($35) quarterly / $US59.99 ($83) yearly

PlayStation Plus Extra

  • Provides all the benefits from the Essential tier
  • Adds a catalog of up to 400* of the most enjoyable PS4 and PS5 games – including blockbuster hits from our PlayStation Studios catalog and third-party partners. Games in the Extra tier are downloadable for play.
  • Price: $14.99 ($20) monthly / $39.99 ($55) quarterly / $99.99 ($135) yearly

PlayStation Plus Premium**

  • Provides all the benefits from Essential and Extra tiers
  • Adds up to 340* additional games, including: PS3 games available via cloud streaming. A catalogue of beloved classic games available in both streaming and download options from the original PlayStation, PS2 and PSP generations
  • Offers cloud streaming access for original PlayStation, PS2, PSP and PS4 games offered in the Extra and Premium tiers in markets** where PlayStation Now is currently available.
  • Customers can stream games using PS4 and PS5 consoles, and PC.*** Time-limited game trials will also be offered in this tier, so customers can try select games before they buy.
  • Price: $US17.99 ($25) monthly / $US49.99 ($69) quarterly / $US119.99 ($167) yearly

PlayStation Plus Deluxe (Select Markets, Including Australia)

  • For markets without cloud streaming, PlayStation Plus Deluxe will be offered at a lower price compared to Premium, and includes a catalog of beloved classic games from the original PlayStation, PS2 and PSP generations to download and play, along with time-limited game trials. Benefits from Essential and Extra tiers are also included. Local pricing will vary by market.

The new service will roll out on PlayStation 4 and PlayStation 5 in the first half of 2022. The service will also include the following games when it launches: Death Stranding, God of War, Marvel’s Spider-Man, Marvel’s Spider-Man: Miles Morales, Mortal Kombat 11, and Returnal.

Essentially the new PS Plus combines the best aspects of Sony’s other two subscription programs, PS Plus and PS Now. It’s an answer to Game Pass, Microsoft’s immensely popular games-on-demand subscription for Xbox and PC. Like Game Pass, Sony’s new service is available at various price points, with more expensive tiers offering better perks. In December, Bloomberg first reported the existence of the service, which was then codenamed “Spartacus.”

The idea was to merge PlayStation’s subscriptions under one tidy umbrella, marrying the games-on-demand library of PS Now with the free monthly games of PS Plus. It will also give access to game demos, a rapidly fading relic in the era of digital ownership. Last week, though, Bloomberg additionally reported that first-party exclusive games, like the forthcoming God of War Ragnarök, wouldn’t be available as day-one releases on the service. That’s a stark contrast to a key selling point for Game Pass: Microsoft releases all first-party games, like Halo Infinite and Forza Horizon 5 immediately upon launch. As far as business moves go, Sony’s is an errant line of dialogue from Pirates of the Caribbean.

In a new interview with GamesIndustry.biz, head of Sony Interactive4 Entertainment, Jim Ryan, confirmed the new PS Plus will not regularly be getting first-party Sony games on launch day.

First-party PlayStation games already fly off the shelves; there’s no reason to put them on a subscription that’ll likely pick up a user base at similar pace, if only for the novelty. To be sure, PS Now technically beat Game Pass to the punch by years in terms of offering a library of hundreds of games and offering those games via cloud streaming. But confusing messaging plus a weird rental rate — you had to pay for a set number of hours or days of access to specific games — turned players off. Even though Sony eventually pivoted the pricing scheme to a more standard monthly membership, the damage was done. It never came close to attaining the industry-shifting numbers of the so-called “Netflix for Games,” which Microsoft recently said has more than 25 million subscribers.

Comments

  • So nearly all the good aspects will be via cloud streaming… Rendering it near functionally worthless to people dealing with internet infrastructure as glorious as Australia’s oh so ‘future proof’ NBN.

    And that’s even if it were to actually launch here at the same time, which I find highly unlikely.

    • Am i reading correctly that on the best tier you get ‘two montly downloadable games’ that may or may not be PS5 games…. and thats the only PS5 content thats availiable?! It doesnt sound like they’ll be a proper library of PS5 titles either dowloadable or streamable if you don’t catch them on any given month.

      It says you can use your PS5 to stream (along with PS4 and PC) but not that there’ll be a library of PS5 content availiable.

      Thats comically shit if so.

      Also streaming is a trash way to play anything that requires reflexs.

      • Two monthly downloadable games is what you get on PS+ which is the base tier. Anything above that gets you access to hundreds of downloadable games.

    • What do you mean? Libs have definitely built a “future-proof” network.. and I quote from their 12 page costings paper pre election- “(the liberal) NBN will also be future-proof as it can be upgraded as necessary”

      And their sinking billions more to “upgrade” so see? It is “future proof”!

  • This is weird. It has returnal, a ps5 exclusive but doesn’t say much else about ps5 games.

    Also wtf **Where PlayStation Now is currently available.

  • Maybe add a disclaimer on this Kotaku Au article to say this is useless for us Aussies because streaming won’t be available here?

  • Why does nobody seem to be calling out the “essential” tier bullshit which is supposed to be what PS+ currently is?

    “Provides the same benefits that PlayStation Plus members are getting today, such as: Two monthly downloadable games, exclusive discounts, cloud storage for saved games, online multiplayer access”

    The benefits we’re getting today are THREE downloadable games per month, not two. In fact this month there were actually 4 games. So they’re actually REDUCING what we’re currently getting,not providing “the same benefits”.

    • What are we calling out, it’s not hiding the fact it’s still PS+
      It’s always been 2 games, they just keep throwing other stuff in there too.
      (There was even that month they chucked 3 PSVR games on top)

      I will be rather disappointed if they do scale back the games though, even if I’m not playing them all, it was nice.

  • You might want to fix the article. You’ve given PS Plus Extra the same features as as PS Plus Premium.

    There’s also no mention of PS Plus Deluxe which is Premium minus streamable games (essentially all PS3 games). Deluxe is what Australia is likely to get instead of Premium.

  • You can’t even copy and paste correctly from the blog post?
    This page has the incorrect info for PS+ Extra. And you should have listed PS+Deluxe instead of premium as that’s what we’ll be getting.

  • Hey guys! Looks like the crosspost from the US website went a little stinky, sorry about that! Will be updating now 🙂

Show more comments

Log in to comment on this story!